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Using Smartphone to Enhance Education

  • Dinesh Kant KumarEmail author
  • Peterjohn Radcliffe
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology book series (BRIEFSAPPLSCIENCES)

Abstract

With the growth of smartphones and associated technologies has come millions of smartphone programs which are called “apps”. Most apps are like any tool, if used sensibly they can be of value, but if used unwisely they can distract students to the detriment of their education. Many techniques that use smartphones have been proposed to help improve student learning and for better educational outcomes. This chapter looks at some of these methods that can help nullify the negative effects of smartphones in the classroom or co-opt them into helping the education process.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Electrical and Biomedical EngineeringRMIT UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Department of EngineeringRMIT UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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