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Ensuring Healthy Lives: Saving Lives at Birth in Indonesia

  • Salut MuhidinEmail author
  • Rachmalina Prasodjo
  • Maria Silalahi
  • Jerico Pardosi
Chapter

Abstract

Programs for saving lives at birth have been implemented in many countries, especially in the less developed countries, such as Indonesia, where maternal and child deaths are still too high. Internationally, ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all is one of the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs) launched in 2015. The UN SDGs is a global plan of action for prosperity, people, and the planet that presents an opportunity to mobilise both government and society to ensure no one is left behind and equality for all. This chapter represents an attempt to understand the varying results achieved at a sub-regional level by a saving lives at birth program in the eastern part of Indonesia. Through this case study, we focus on identifying the barriers to program participation and the enablers that successfully prompt women to give birth at a health facility. We also explore two theoretical frameworks used in business and economics—social marketing for health promotion and shared leadership—to ascertain whether they might improve the region’s saving lives program.

Keywords

Saving lives at birth Indonesia Social marketing Shared leadership Maternal health Mortality 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Salut Muhidin
    • 1
    Email author
  • Rachmalina Prasodjo
    • 2
  • Maria Silalahi
    • 3
  • Jerico Pardosi
    • 4
  1. 1.Macquarie UniversitySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Ministry of HealthSouth JakartaIndonesia
  3. 3.NTT Provincial Women Empowerment and Child ProtectionKupangIndonesia
  4. 4.Queensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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