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General Introduction of the Yanzhuang Meteorite

  • Xiande XieEmail author
  • Ming Chen
Chapter
  • 14 Downloads

Abstract

On October 31, 1990, at 21:45 Beijing time, the Yanzhuang meteorite fell in the field of the Yanzhuang village, Wengyuang County, Guangdong Province. Ten fragments, totaling 3.5 kg, were recovered during the field survey. This meteorite is assigned to an H6 (S6) chondrite. It is composed of light-colored unmelted chondritic rock and black-colored molten mass. Constituent minerals in the Yanzhuang unmelted chondritic rock comprise olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, plagioclase, maskelynite, kamacite, taenite, troilite, and small amount of merrillite, chromite, and ilmenite. The shock-induced melt is composed of microcrystalline olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, FeNi and FeS nodules, and glassy materials.

Keywords

On-spot survey Yanzhuang chondrite Unmelted chondritic rock Shock-produced melt 

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Copyright information

© Guangdong Science & Technology Press Co., Ltd and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Guangzhou Institute of GeochemistryChinese Academy of SciencesGuangzhouChina

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