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Management of Patient with Traumatic Brain Injury: SDH

  • Dhritiman Chakrabarti
  • Deepti B. Srinivas
Chapter
  • 30 Downloads

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the major causes of mortality and long-term morbidity in today’s society. The incidence of TBI in India has not been published till date although individual state data is published from time to time [1].

Notes

Acknowledgement

This manuscript would not have been possible without the support of Arpitha A. J. who also helped in reviewing the manuscript.

Multiple Choice Questions

  1. 1.
    Which of the following brain oxygenation monitoring modalities is recommended in the fourth edition of BTF guidelines?
    1. (a)

      Brain tissue oxygen monitoring.

       
    2. (b)

      NIRS-based cerebral oximetry.

       
    3. (c)

      Jugular venous oximetry.

       
    4. (d)

      Microdialysis.

       

    Answer: c

     
  2. 2.
    Is prophylactic hypothermia useful for improving outcomes in severe head injury?
    1. (a)

      If initiated early (<2.5 h), it improves outcomes.

       
    2. (b)

      If target temperature (<32 °C) is achieved, it improves outcomes.

       
    3. (c)

      If target temperature is maintained for 48 h, it improves outcomes.

       
    4. (d)

      It is not useful.

       

    Answer: d

     
  3. 3.
    Which of the following statements is correct?
    1. (a)

      Methylprednisolone administration does not improve outcomes in patients with SDH.

       
    2. (b)

      Steroids may be used in management of TBI patients if central adrenal insufficiency is suspected.

       
    3. (c)

      None of the above.

       
    4. (d)

      Both 1 and 2.

       

    Answer: d

     
  4. 4.
    Which of the following statements is correct?
    1. (a)

      Phenytoin reduces incidence of early post-traumatic seizures.

       
    2. (b)

      Phenytoin reduces incidence of late post-traumatic seizures.

       
    3. (c)

      Phenytoin is better than valproate in reducing incidence of early post-traumatic seizures.

       
    4. (d)

      Phenytoin is not recommended for reducing incidence of any post-traumatic seizures.

       

    Answer: a

     
  5. 5.
    Pressure reactivity index (PRx) is useful quantifying:
    1. (a)

      Cerebral compliance.

       
    2. (b)

      Intracranial pressure.

       
    3. (c)

      Autoregulation.

       
    4. (d)

      Cerebral blood flow.

       

    Answer: c

     

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© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dhritiman Chakrabarti
    • 1
  • Deepti B. Srinivas
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neuroanesthesiology and Neurocritical CareNIMHANSBangaloreIndia
  2. 2.Division of Neuroanaesthesia and Neurocritical CareApollo HospitalsBangaloreIndia

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