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Roles of Social Learning Network in Educational Tourism in Dairy Farms

  • Yasuo OheEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This Chapter conceptual and empirically evaluates an open social learning network of dairy farmers who provide the educational service and formation of operators’ attitudes toward establishing a viable service because this open network nurtures entrepreneurship reciprocally among members.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Food and Resource EconomicsChiba UniversityChibaJapan

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