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Routing and Security Issues in Cognitive Radio Ad Hoc Networks (CRAHNs)—a Comprehensive Survey

  • Anshu DhawanEmail author
  • C. K. Jha
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 1059)

Abstract

Cognitive Radio has been considered as a potential contender to interpret the problems of limited availability of spectrum and inefficiency of spectrum usage. Cognitive radio ad hoc networks (CRAHNs) are integrated with both cognitive and spectrum properties therefore routing is the most important parameter that needs to be addressed. Due to higher mobility of nodes, cooperative communication among nodes and multiplicity in the available channels makes the routing protocols for CRAHNs more vulnerable to security attacks. Hence, routing and security are important considerations that need to be addressed individually. It is essential to design a secured spectrum-aware routing protocols to offer healthier stable routing performance and enhanced security. In this paper, the challenges and solutions for routing and security of CRAHNS are outlined. Fundamentally, CRAHNs are more susceptible to security threats because of its intrinsic nature. Hence in order to validate it, an algorithm has been proposed in the paper to check the vulnerability of multi-channel CRAHNs.

Keywords

Cognitive radio Cognitive radio ad hoc network Routing protocols Spectrum awareness Security 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceBanasthali Vidyapith UniversityRajasthanIndia

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