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International Public Health and the Burden of Diseases

  • Mbuso Precious Mabuza
Chapter

Abstract

Tackling the global disease burden is paramount in the context of the burgeoning epidemic of communicable and non-communicable diseases, especially in low- and middle-income countries. While most high-income countries have successfully implemented cost-effective interventions to tackle their burden of non-communicable diseases, low- and middle-income countries have to prioritise cost-effective interventions to tackle the multiple burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases and to strengthen their efforts to effectively address other key issues of public health concern. The irony is that while low- and middle-income countries carry the heaviest burden of disease, such countries have a minor share of the total global health spending, yet their economies are severely challenged and their populations are the most affected by poverty which has a negative impact on health. This chapter gives a critical overview on the following topics: What is International Public Health? Epidemiology and the burden of diseases; Understanding the magnitude of the disease burden.

Keywords

Ambient air pollution Burden of disease Cancer Cardiovascular diseases Chronic respiratory conditions Communicable diseases Demographic transition Diabetes Disability-adjusted life year Cholera Ebola Epidemic Epidemiological transition Epidemiology Global health Hepatitis HIV and AIDS Incidence Injuries International public health Malaria Mental health Mortality Non-communicable diseases Prevalence Quality-adjusted life years Tropical diseases Tuberculosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mbuso Precious Mabuza
    • 1
  1. 1.Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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