Advertisement

Introduction: Brokerage, Gender and Precarity in Asia’s Migration Industry

  • Michiel BaasEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Due to the commercialization of migration pathways, the opportunity to migrate has opened up to an ever-widening group of potential migrants. Furthermore, the ongoing formalization and regulation of migration trajectories also makes that increasingly migrants have no choice but to seek out the services of specialists in order to meet stringent rules and regulations. This Introduction argues that the emergence of a migration industry across Asia needs to be understood in this light. Asking two interrelated questions—what is the migration industry and what is lacking in its analysis so far—this chapter shows how each of the studies included in this edited volume provides important insight to this.

References

  1. Baas, M. (2007). The mobile middle: Indian skilled migrants in Singapore and the ‘middling’ space between migration categories. Transitions: Journal of Transient Migration, 1(1), 47–63.Google Scholar
  2. Betts, A. (2013). The migration industry in global migration governance. In T. Gammeltoft-Hansen & N. Nyberg Sørensen (Eds.), The migration industry and the commercialization of international migration (pp. 45–63). London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  3. Cohen, R. (1997). Global diasporas: An introduction. London: UCL Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Cranston, S., Schapendonk, J., & Spaan, E. (2018). New directions in exploring the migration industries: Introduction to special issue. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 44(4), 543–557.  https://doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2017.1315504.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Faist, T. (2014). Brokerage in cross-border mobility: Social mechanisms and the (re)production of social inequalities. Social Inclusion, 2(4), 38–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Garapich, M. P. (2008). The migration industry and civil society: Polish immigrants in the United Kingdom before and after EU enlargement. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 34(5), 701–706.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Hernández-León, R. (2008). Metropolitan migrants: The migration of urban Mexicans to the United States. New York: Russell Sage.Google Scholar
  8. Hernández-León, R. (2013). Conceptualizing the migration industry. In T. Gammeltoft-Hansen & N. Nyberg Sørensen (Eds.), The migration industry and the commercialization of international migration (pp. 24–44). London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  9. Kern, A., & Müller-Böker, U. (2015). The middle space of migration: A case study on brokerage and recruitment agencies in Nepal. Geoforum, 65, 158–169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Kyle, D., & Liang, Z. (2001). Migration merchants: Human smuggling from Ecuador and China. UC San Diego: Center for Comparative Immigration Studies. Retrieved from https://escholarship.org/uc/item/5h24b7j6.
  11. Light, I. (2013). The migration industry in the United States, 1882–1924. Migration Studies, 1(3), 258–275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Lindquist, J. (2010). Labour recruitment, circuits of capital and gendered mobility: Reconceptualizing the Indonesia migration industry. Pacific Affairs, 83(1), 115–132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Lindquist, J. (2015). Of figured and types: Brokering knowledge and migration in Indonesia and beyond. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 21, 162–177.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Lindquist, J., Xiang, B., & Yeoh, B. S. A. (2010). Introduction: Opening the black box of migration: Brokers, the organization of transnational mobility and the changing political economy in Asia. Pacific Affairs, 83(1), 7–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Massey, D., Arango, J., Hugo, G., Kouaouci, A., Pellegrino, A., & Taylor, J. T. (1998). Worlds in motion: Understanding international migration at the end of the Millennium. Oxford: Oxford Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  16. McKeown, A. (2008). Melancholy Order: Asian migration and the globalization of borders. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Nyberg Sørensen, N., & Gammeltoft-Hansen, T. (2013). Introduction. In T. Gammeltoft-Hansen & N. Nyberg Sørensen (Eds.), The migration industry and the commercialization of international migration (pp. 1–23). London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  18. Spaan, E., & Hillmann, F. (2013). Migration trajectories and the migration industry: Theoretical reflections and empirical examples from Asia. In T. Gammeltoft-Hansen & N. Nyberg Sørensen (Eds.), The migration industry and the commercialization of international migration (pp. 64–85). London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  19. Surak, K. (2017). Migration industries and the state: Guestwork programs in East Asia. International Migration Review.  https://doi.org/10.1111/imre.12308.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore

Personalised recommendations