Advertisement

Energy Transition Driven by the Energy Internet

  • Jijiang HeEmail author
  • Yu Wang
  • Wenying Chen
Chapter
Part of the Research Series on the Chinese Dream and China’s Development Path book series (RSCDCDP)

Abstract

To achieve carbon neutrality, a country must first phase out fossil fuels and increase the percentage of renewable energy in its energy systems, including electric power, heating, and transportation systems. Wind and solar power will be the primary energy sources of the future. To solve the volatility of wind and solar power, grids which integrate a high proportion of renewable energy sources must provide sufficient flexibility to ensure energy security. The Energy Internet is a new energy utilization system which offers greater flexibility and increases the share of energy generated from renewable sources. The development of the Energy Internet has significant implications for carbon neutrality and energy transition. By using it wisely, the entire society, including construction, mining, manufacturing and transportation sectors, will be able to replace fossil fuels with renewable sources. China has rolled out policies to support the development the Energy Internet, and launched a wide range of Energy Internet pilot projects.

Keywords

Energy internet Energy transition Flexibility 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study is funded by the “Technological Advancements and Climate Change Policies” research program of the Ministry of Science and Technology.

References

  1. 1.
    Gao, H. (2009). New development in EU climate change policy. Global Science, Technology and Economy Outlook, 2009(12), 46–50.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Wang, Z. (2011). The German Federal Government’s Energy Plan for 2050—Environmentally friendly, safe, reliable and economically viable energy supply. Global Science, Technology and Economy Outlook, 3, 5–17.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Qin, H. (2017). Visible and invisible. Wind Energy, 2017(2), 1.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Zhang, W. (2016). Germany relies on market transactions and regulations to ramp up wind power consumption. Wind Energy, 2016(2), 36.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Energy Research Institute of the National Development and Reform Commission. (2015). China’s 2050 renewable energy development scenario and pathway study. April 2015.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Rifkin, J. (2012). The third industrial revolution. China: CITIC Publishing House.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Tian, S., Yan, W., Zhang, D., et al. (2015). Energy internet technologies and application. Proceedings of the CSEE, 2015(14), 3482–3494.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    He, J. (2016). Electric vehicles are a pillar of the energy internet. China Power Enterprise Management, 2016(3).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    He, J. (2015). China’s clean energy solution. China Power Enterprise Management, 2015(7), 18–21.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Energy Research Institute of the National Development and Reform Commission. (2015). China’s 2050 renewable energy development scenario and pathway study. April 2015.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Dong, C., Zhao, J., Fu, W., et al. (2014). From smart grids to the energy internet: Basic concepts and theoretical frameworks. Automation of Electric Power Systems, 2014(15), 1–11.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Qinghai has been powered by clean energy for seven days non-stop. Retrieved June 20, 2017, from http://www.sgcc.com.cn/xwzx/gsyw/2017/06/340536.shtml.
  13. 13.
    Qinghai has been powered by clean energy for seven days non-stop. Power & Energy, 2017(3), 336.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Zhang, W., & Yang, T. (2015). A study of the hydropower and solar power supply systems in longyang valley. Journal of North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power (Natural Science Edition), 2015(3), 76–81.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Social Sciences Academic Press and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Energy Policy Research Office, Energy Internet Research Institute, Tsinghua UniversityBeijingChina
  2. 2.Institute for Energy, Environment, and Economy, Tsinghua UniversityBeijingChina

Personalised recommendations