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China’s Role in Global Climate Governance and Causal Analysis

Chapter
Part of the Research Series on the Chinese Dream and China’s Development Path book series (RSCDCDP)

Abstract

As one of the world’s biggest emitter of greenhouse gases, China is a key player in global climate governance and has a huge amount of influence on the development of the global climate governance mechanisms. Since 2011, China has played a central role in global climate governance, which is inseparable from China’s growing willingness and improved ability to cooperate with other countries.

Keywords

Global climate governance mechanism China’s role Willingness to cooperate Ability to cooperate 

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Copyright information

© Social Sciences Academic Press and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of International Relations and Public AffairsFudan UniversityShanghaiChina

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