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Muslim Brotherhood and Salafism

  • Joas WagemakersEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Islam has long played an important role in the Jordanian state and society. The country has a regime whose royal family can boast of a robust Islamic pedigree, and apart from the state’s institutions, which represent “official Islam” and the spirituality found in Sufism, Jordan has also witnessed the rise of Islamic movements of various types. Two movements in Jordan that are quite popular are the Muslim Brotherhood and Salafism. This chapter focuses on them, giving special attention to how they have negotiated their relations with the regime throughout their history.

Keywords

Islamic movements Muslim Brotherhood Salafism Jordan Islamic Action Front 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Philosophy and Religious StudiesUtrecht UniversityUtrechtThe Netherlands

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