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Crimes and Internal Security in Nigeria

  • James Olabisi Ayodele
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses crime/offence as an act or omission which violates existing laws in Nigeria. It attempts to differentiate between crime/offence from general deviant behaviour as well as from civil wrong (tort). It alludes to the complex process required for establishing the culpability or otherwise of any person accused of committing crime/offence because the law presumes the innocence of the accused. The chapter explores the various dimensions and manifestations of crime/offence in Nigeria to include crime against the state, persons, property and public order. Arguing that crime/offence is a major cause of insecurity in Nigeria, quality efforts are invested in demonstrating that both citizens and government violate laws despite that government does not usually prosecute itself. Three major types of crime-related insecurity, namely life-insecurity, knowledge-insecurity and labour-insecurity, are identified and treated in the chapter. It is recommended that Nigerian government should get its priority right by mobilising against those criminalities (armed robbery, terrorism, murder, etc.) that constitute serious threat to its survival. Nonetheless, it is concluded that the Nigerian state stands to benefit from lawbreakers if properly processed.

Keywords

Law Deviant behaviour State and crime 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Olabisi Ayodele
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyObafemi Awolowo UniversityIle-IfeNigeria

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