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Blockchain Technology in Healthcare

  • Janya Chanchaichujit
  • Albert Tan
  • Fanwen Meng
  • Sarayoot Eaimkhong
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, we introduce blockchain as an effective system to manage patient records and track medical drugs along the pharmaceutical supply chain. Blockchain technology, in short, is a digitalized and decentralized ledger that could be made public or private depending on the user where transactional data is being recorded and unable to be tampered with in the system. Blockchain offers a robust tracking solution for healthcare patients and medical drugs. The application of blockchain technology to healthcare is in its infancy, and there are still some challenges in deploying it in the healthcare sector.

Keywords

Blockchain Decentralized Peer-to-peer Distributed ledger Smart contract Pharmaceutical supply chain 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The authors would like to express their sincere gratitude to Dr Albert Tan’s students at Curtin University, Singapore, who have contributed their work to this chapter: Ms. Vithya Laxme Samiappan and Ms. Vu My Linh for their research on developing a concept framework for blockchain technology and case studies in drug traceability and Electronic Health Records in Vietnam.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janya Chanchaichujit
    • 1
  • Albert Tan
    • 2
  • Fanwen Meng
    • 3
  • Sarayoot Eaimkhong
    • 4
  1. 1.School of ManagementWalailak UniversityThasalaThailand
  2. 2.Malaysia Institute for Supply Chain InnovationShah AlamMalaysia
  3. 3.Department of Health Services & Outcomes ResearchNational Healthcare GroupSingaporeSingapore
  4. 4.National Science and Technology Development AgencyPathum ThaniThailand

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