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Taurine 11 pp 775-785 | Cite as

Alteration of Placental Deiodinase 3 Expression by BDE 209 and Possible Protection by Taurine in Human Placenta-Derived JEG Cells Under Hypoxia

  • Ying Cheng
  • Chang Qin
  • Xiaoji Hao
  • Ruonan Wang
  • Xiaoying Niu
  • Zhenwei Li
  • Xiaona Shang
  • Jing Shao
  • Yuxin Wang
  • Xiaohui Liu
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1155)

Abstract

Thyroid hormones are key hormones involved in growth and development. Changes in their levels can cause embryonic brain developmental damage in the first trimester. Studies have shown that polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have developmental neurotoxicity as environmental pollutants, and exposure during pregnancy can cause irreversible brain damage in offspring, similar to the interference effects of thyroid hormones, but its mechanism has not yet been understood. Since the physiological environment for placental cells is highly hypoxic, in the current study, the human placenta-derived JEG cells were cultured at 1% oxygen, 4% carbon dioxide and 94% nitrogen, to reflect in vivo scenario, and the possible protection of taurine on BDE 209-mediated toxicity in JEG cells was studied. Our data showed that different concentrations of BDE 209 can have profound effects on cell viability and placental deiodinase 3 expression under hypoxic culture condition. Taurine was found to improve BDE 209-induced reductions in cell viability and altered gene and protein expressions of placental deiodinases. The results provide a reference for the establishment of early biomarkers and effective preventive measures.

Keywords

JEG cells Hypoxia Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) Taurine Deiodinases Developmental neurotoxicity 

Abbreviations

Dio

Deiodinase

JEG

Human trophoblastic JEG-3 cells

MTT

4,5-Dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide

PBDEs

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers

TH

Thyroid hormone

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81773389), Dalian Tech Star Programme (2016RQ044) and China’s Post-doctoral Science Fund (2016M591438).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ying Cheng
    • 1
  • Chang Qin
    • 1
  • Xiaoji Hao
    • 1
  • Ruonan Wang
    • 1
  • Xiaoying Niu
    • 1
  • Zhenwei Li
    • 2
  • Xiaona Shang
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jing Shao
    • 1
  • Yuxin Wang
    • 4
  • Xiaohui Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.Dalian Key Laboratory of Hematology; Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public HealthDalian Medical UniversityDalianChina
  2. 2.Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public HealthZhejiang Chinese Medical UniversityZhejiangChina
  3. 3.Pharmaron Beijing Co., Ltd.BeijingChina
  4. 4.Biochemistry DepartmentMaternal and Child Care Service Center of DalianDalianChina

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