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Taurine 11 pp 729-738 | Cite as

Radio-Protective Effects of Loliolus beka Gray Meat Consisted of a Plentiful Taurine Against Damages Caused by Gamma Ray Irradiation

  • WonWoo Lee
  • Hye-Won Yang
  • Seon-Heui Cha
  • Eui Joeng Han
  • Eun-Ji Shin
  • Hee-Jin Han
  • Kyungsook Jung
  • Soo-Jin Heo
  • Eun-A Kim
  • Kil-Nam Kim
  • Sang-Cheol Kim
  • Min-Jeong Seo
  • Min Ju Kim
  • You-Jin Jeon
  • Ginnae AhnEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1155)

Abstract

Gamma ray irradiation causes immune suppression, in which oxidative stress reduces cell viability and damages immune cells. In the present study, we investigated whether Loliolus beka gray meat (LBM), which contains large amounts of taurine, protects against damage of murine splenocytes by oxidative stress. An aqueous extract of LBM (LBMW) was prepared, which contained plentiful levels of taurine. LBMW improved cell viability of gamma ray-irradiated murine splenocytes, an effect that was associated with significant reduction in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also showed that the production of nitric oxide (NO) and ROS in gamma ray-irradiated zebrafish embryos, as well as the death of the embryos, were diminished by LBMW. These data suggest that the consumption of taurine-rich foods, such as LBM, may be used in the protection of cells against oxidative stress.

Keywords

Loliolus beka gray Gamma ray irradiation ROS Zebrafish embryos 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (2018016523).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • WonWoo Lee
    • 1
  • Hye-Won Yang
    • 2
  • Seon-Heui Cha
    • 3
  • Eui Joeng Han
    • 4
  • Eun-Ji Shin
    • 4
  • Hee-Jin Han
    • 4
  • Kyungsook Jung
    • 5
  • Soo-Jin Heo
    • 6
  • Eun-A Kim
    • 6
  • Kil-Nam Kim
    • 7
  • Sang-Cheol Kim
    • 1
  • Min-Jeong Seo
    • 1
  • Min Ju Kim
    • 4
  • You-Jin Jeon
    • 2
  • Ginnae Ahn
    • 4
    • 8
    Email author
  1. 1.Freshwater Biosources Utilization Bureau, Bioresources Industrialization Support DivisionNakdonggang National Institute of Biological Resources (NNIBR)SangjuRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Marine Life ScienceJeju National UniversityJejuRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of Marine BioindustryHanseo UniversitySeosanRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Department of Food Technology and NutritionChonnam National UniversityYeosuRepublic of Korea
  5. 5.Natural Product Material Research CenterKorea Research Institute of Bioscience and BiotechnologyJeongeup-siRepublic of Korea
  6. 6.Jeju International Marine Science Center for Research & EducationKorea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology (KIOST)JejuRepublic of Korea
  7. 7.Chuncheon CenterKorea Basic Science Institute (KBSI)ChuncheonRepublic of Korea
  8. 8.Department of Marine Bio-Food SciencesChonnam National UniversityYeosuRepublic of Korea

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