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A Systemic Functional Approach to Clause Combining in English

  • Qingshun He
Chapter
Part of the The M.A.K. Halliday Library Functional Linguistics Series book series (TMAKHLFLS)

Abstract

SFL consists of two parts: systemic grammar and functional grammar. In systemic grammar, language is considered as a system of meaning potential, and form is the realization of meaning. In functional grammar, form is represented as a rank constituent structure, based on which, a functional syntactic structure is associated with the three metafunctions of language, including the transitivity structure realizing ideational function, the mood structure realizing interpersonal function, and the thematic and information structures realizing textual function.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qingshun He
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Foreign LanguagesSun Yat-Sen UniversityGuangzhouChina

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