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Behavioural Support in the Republic of Korea

  • Yoon-Suk HwangEmail author
  • Jeong-Ah Ku
  • Mi-Jin Song
  • Jae-Eun Noh
Chapter
  • 74 Downloads
Part of the Advancing Inclusive and Special Education in the Asia-Pacific book series (AISEAP)

Abstract

The provision of learning support for students with challenging behaviour has been an ongoing practice in Korean special and inclusive education settings. However, it was only recently that behavioural support was specifically included in the Ministry of Education’s special education policy. For example, improvements in the capacity of special education teachers to provide behavioural support were documented as a focus area in the 4th Special Education 5-year Development Plan (2013–2017). Subsequently, Education Offices have developed and distributed behavioural support manuals to teachers of schools within their jurisdiction. The recent developments also include a shift in behavioural support practices. Current practices stress the importance of the context and environments within which students’ problem behaviour take place. This is a noticeable change from traditional approaches, which place a focus on an individual student who exhibited problem behaviours. In this chapter, we examine characteristics of positive behaviour support (PBS) in Korea; the social and educational backgrounds that necessitated the new initiatives in behaviour management; newly introduced and implemented behavioural support policies for students with disabilities; educational, administrative, and financial support for behaviour management; and research conducted to investigate the effects of PBS interventions in Korean education settings, along with school members’ experiences of participating in and implementing PBS. We conclude this chapter with future directions for PBS in Korea.

Keywords

Positive behaviour support Challenging behaviour Disability Education Human rights Korea 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Professor Dae Young Jung for his feedback on the earlier version of the chapter.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoon-Suk Hwang
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jeong-Ah Ku
    • 2
  • Mi-Jin Song
    • 3
  • Jae-Eun Noh
    • 1
  1. 1.Learning Sciences Institute AustraliaAustralian Catholic UniversityBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.Daejeon UniversityDaejeonRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Gimhae Eunhye SchoolJangyuRepublic of Korea

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