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Imaging Pattern-Based Diagnostic Algorithm

  • Ke Ding
  • Jiali Wang
  • Hui Dai
  • Zhiming Xiang
  • Chi S. Zee
Chapter

Abstract

Medical imaging has been widely used in the diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of the disease. Radiologists only extract the subjective and semiquantitative information from medical imaging. In fact, a variety of imaging tools not only can be used to display the general description but also contain a large number of information which can be excavated deeply. If we can decode integrated image information which can be effected by the factors in patients’ cells, physiological and genetic variation and we can present the content objectively and quantitatively in the clinical diagnosis and prognostic evaluation, which as a part of the whole analytic process, will undoubtedly bring clinical medical about a significance revolution of the development of noninvasive technique.

Keywords

Radiomics CNS infections Rim enhancement WM hyperintensity Neuroimmunology 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ke Ding
    • 1
  • Jiali Wang
    • 2
  • Hui Dai
    • 3
  • Zhiming Xiang
    • 4
  • Chi S. Zee
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyThird Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical UniversityNanningChina
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyAffiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical UniversityXuzhouChina
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyFirst Affiliated Hospital of Soochow UniversitySuzhouChina
  4. 4.Department of RadiologyGuangzhou Panyu Center HospitalGuangzhouChina
  5. 5.Department of RadiologyKeck School of Medicine, University of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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