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Overview of Neuroimmunology

  • Heng Liu
  • Li Li
  • Hongjun Li
Chapter

Abstract

Patients with neuroimmunological syndromes pose many clinical challenges for the attending physician. Even experienced clinicians occasionally arrive at the point where diagnostic, work-up, treatment, or prognosis becomes blocked.

Keywords

Neuroimmunological syndromes Multiple sclerosis Granulomatous diseases Autoimmune encephalitis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heng Liu
    • 1
  • Li Li
    • 2
  • Hongjun Li
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyAffiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical UniversityZunyiChina
  2. 2.Department of Radiology, Beijing You’an HospitalCapital Medical UniversityBeijingChina

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