Advertisement

What Is “Human Dimensions”?

  • Ryo Sakurai
Chapter
Part of the Ecological Research Monographs book series (ECOLOGICAL)

Abstract

Human dimensions of wildlife management (HDW) is an academic discipline founded and developed in the USA. HDW could be explained simply as a practical science for implementing wildlife management utilizing a social science approach. HDW aims to realize effective wildlife management practices by reflecting the needs and opinions of citizens and stakeholders into the adopted policies. The significance of HDW is that it enables managers to increase fairness, balance, and legitimacy in the decision-making process by including stakeholder’ needs and opinions. HDW has begun to be recognized outside of North America, particularly in Europe and Africa; however, it remains a relatively new field, struggling to be accepted as an academic discipline. Meanwhile, HDW is currently not well known in many Asian countries. I establish here the importance of adopting these methods in Asian countries and the reasons behind their hesitancy for doing so.

References

  1. Boomgaard P. “Primitive” tiger hunters in Indonesia and Malaysia, 1800–1950. In: Knight J, editor. Wildlife in Asia: cultural perspectives. New York: Routledge; 2013. p. 185–206.Google Scholar
  2. Chapron G, et al. Recovery of large carnivores in Europe’s modern human-dominated landscapes. Science. 2014;366(6216):1517–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Child B. The practice and principles of community-based wildlife management in Zimbabwe: the CAMPFIRE programme. Biodivers Conserv. 1996;5:369–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Decker DJ, Chase LC. Human dimensions of living with wildlife: a management challenge for the 21st century. Wildl Soc Bull. 1997;25:788–95.Google Scholar
  5. Decker DJ, Brown TL, Siemer WF. Human dimensions of wildlife management in North America. Bethesda: The Wildlife Society; 2001.Google Scholar
  6. Decker DJ, Riley SJ, Siemer WF. Human dimensions of wildlife management. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press; 2012.Google Scholar
  7. Dressel S, Sandstrom C, Ericsson G. A meta-analysis of studies on attitudes toward bears and wolves across Europe 1976–2012. Conserv Biol. 2014;29(2):565–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Fazio JR, Gilbert DL. Public relations and communications for natural resource managers. 2nd ed. Dubuque: Kendal/Hunt; 1986.Google Scholar
  9. Gandiwa E, Heitonig IMA, Lokhorst AM, Prins HHT, Leeuwis C. CAMPFIRE and human-wildlife conflicts in local communities bordering Northern Gonarezhou National Park, Zimbabwe. Ecol Soc. 2013;18(4):7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Glikman JA, Frank B. Human dimensions of wildlife in Europe: the Italian way. Hum Dimens Wildl. 2011;16:368–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Gray PA, Boxall P, Reid R, Filion FL, DuWors E, Jacquemot A, Bouchard P, Bath A. Proceedings of the International Union Game Biologists XXI Congress; 1993. p. 151–157.Google Scholar
  12. Jacobson S. Communication skills for conservation professionals. 2nd ed. Washington, DC: Island Press; 2009.Google Scholar
  13. Johansson M, Dressel S, Kvastegard E, Ericsson G, Fischer A, Kaltenborn BP, Vaske JJ, Sandstrom C. Hum Dimens Wildl. 2016;21(2):158–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Knight J. Wildlife in Asia: cultural perspectives. New York: Routledge; 2013.Google Scholar
  15. Leong KM, Haigh JT. Deer, people and parks: human dimensions of deer issues in national parks. 2007. http://www.dnr.cornell.edu/research/deerinparks/index.asp. Accessed 12 Dec 2009.
  16. Manfredo MJ, Vaske JJ. Human dimensions of wildlife: introduction. Hum Dimens Wildl. 1996;1:5–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Manfredo MJ. Who cares about wildlife? Social science concepts for exploring human-wildlife relationships and conservation issues. New York: Springer; 2009.Google Scholar
  18. Marker LL, Boast LK. Human-wildlife conflict 10 years later: lessons learned and their application to Cheetah conservation. Hum Dimens Wildl. 2015:1–8.Google Scholar
  19. Natuurnav T. The imperial lion. Human dimensions of wildlife management in Central Africa. S Afr J Wildl Res. 1989;19(3):126–7.Google Scholar
  20. Organ JF, Batcheller GR. Chapter 12: Reviving the Public Trust Doctrine as a foundation for wildlife management in North America. In: Manfredo MJ, Vaske JJ, Brown PJ, Decker DJ, Duke EA, editors. Wildlife and society: the science of human dimensions. Washington, DC: Island Press; 2009. p. 161–71.Google Scholar
  21. Osborn FV, Hill CM. Techniques to reduce crop loss: human and technical dimension in Africa. In: Woodroffe R, Thirgood S, Rabinowitz A, editors. People and wildlife: conflict or coexistence. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; 2005. p. 72–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Rangarajan M. The Raj and the natural world: the war against “dangerous beasts” in Colonial India. In: Knight J, editor. Wildlife in Asia: cultural perspectives. New York: Routledge; 2013. p. 207–32.Google Scholar
  23. Seeland K. Wildlife depredations in Jigme Dorji National Park, Bhutan. In: Knight J, editor. Wildlife in Asia: cultural perspectives. New York: Routledge; 2013. p. 131–46.Google Scholar
  24. Thirgood S, Woodroffe R, Rabinowitz A. The impact of human-wildlife conflict on human lives and livelihoods. In: Woodroffe R, Thirgood S, Rabinowitz A, editors. People and wildlife: conflict or coexistence? Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; 2005. p. 13–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Vaske JJ, Shelby LB, Manfredo MJ. Bibliometric reflections on the first decade of human dimensions of wildlife. Hum Dimens Wildl. 2006;11:79–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Woodroffe R, Thirgood S, Rabinowitz A. The impact of human-wildlife conflict on natural systems. In: Woodroffe R, Thirgood S, Rabinowitz A, editors. People and Wildlife: conflict or coexistence? Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; 2005. p. 1–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryo Sakurai
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Policy ScienceRitsumeikan UniversityOsakaJapan

Personalised recommendations