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Awakening Myths, Legends and Heritage

  • K. Krishnan
  • Vrushab Mahesh
Chapter

Abstract

K. Krishnan and Vrushab Mahesh focus on the design and development of the Bindu Sarovar Museum at Sidhpur in the Indian State of Gujarat. A sristhal or pious place, Sidhpur is considered one of the holiest Hindu sites to perform shradha or post-funerary rites for one’s mother. In this context, a group of academics, religious practioners, policy makers and community stakeholders came together to fashion a modern museum, which presents myth, legend and religious and ritual practices. Drawing from the site’s deep intangible heritage traditions, this chapter will evaluate whether this development met its stated goals of satisfying the intellectual curiosity of visitors, developed their sense of the past and awareness of heritage of the region and, finally, is providing opportunities to generate income for resident populations.

Keywords

India Sidhpur Museum Death ritual 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Krishnan
    • 1
  • Vrushab Mahesh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Archaeology and Ancient HistoryThe Maharaja Sayajirao University of BarodaVadodaraIndia

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