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Applied Measurements and Instrumentation for Improving Diagnostic Devices and Systems in Metropolitan Polluted Environments with Nitric and Carbon Oxides

  • Lavinia Andrei
  • Doru BăldeanEmail author
  • Adela Ioana Borzan
Conference paper
Part of the IFMBE Proceedings book series (IFMBE, volume 71)

Abstract

The problem of pollution in transportation and road traffic, especially in metropolitan areas, rise a significant concern regarding the health of the inhabitants and the rapid diagnostic procedures on site. It is important to know exactly what the problem is when it comes to toxicity in highly traffic areas. The present paper shows an applied solution for monitoring and control of pollutants, such as nitric oxides and carbon oxide in automotive and transportation sector in order to increase the potential of health security in road traffic activity. There were some measurements done in laboratory. Also the sensors were calibrated and tested. A hardware in the loop system was also used in order to test the validity of the hypotheses for monitoring and for giving the signal of hazard condition regarding pollution with nitric and carbon oxides.

Keywords

Nitrogen Carbon Pollutant Sensor Instrument 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The paper has been realized on the basis of the research contract “PN-III-P2-2.1-CI-2018-1227” (VINEFUEL).

Conflict of Interest

“The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest”. The authors of this work have no financial or ownership profits in any equipment or elements described. The article’s authors declare that all of them have no inherent economic, professional or personal benefits which could have determined the outputs or trend-lines of the analyze presented in this paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lavinia Andrei
    • 1
  • Doru Băldean
    • 2
    Email author
  • Adela Ioana Borzan
    • 2
  1. 1.Health DepartmentClinical Hospital of Infectious DiseasesCluj-NapocaRomania
  2. 2.Ministry of EducationTechnical University of Cluj-Napoca/Automotive and Transportation DepartmentCluj-NapocaRomania

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