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Japan’s Civil Code Drafting Support for Socialist Reform Countries: Diversity of Normative Choice

  • Yuka KanekoEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Kobe University Monograph Series in Social Science Research book series (KUMSSSR)

Abstract

This article will review the context of civil code drafting in the the“transition” countries in Asia after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, with a focus on the changing relation between the economic law and the civil law in the historical path of socialist legal reforms. Japanese ODA which has taken a unique position in the process. While most of the capitalist code systems still maintain the binary structure of civil code (as modernist ideal) and commercial code (as merchandize practice), the Russia 1995 Civil Code was an avant-garde attempt to integrate the code norms. Asian civil codes seem to be deviated from Russian influence, probably as a result of the pressure of international donor agencies calling for investor-friendly legal reforms. The normative confrontation in the boundary of civil, commercial and consumer laws will be investigated on selected issues of debate in civil code drafting.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Kobe UniversityKobeJapan

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