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Teaching AIDS pp 149-187 | Cite as

AIDS Awareness Campaigns: Pedagogy as Strategy

  • Dilip K. Das
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines HIV/AIDS awareness campaigns in two contexts: the history of public health governance and health education and the history of the institutionalization of AIDS pedagogy through NACO and successive AIDS control policies. Drawing on these contexts, it discusses a number of pedagogic interventions in terms of their rationality, modes of governance, semiotic effects and effects on subjectivity.

Keywords

Public health paradigms Heath education Strategic pedagogies IEC Critical pedagogy Nationalization NACO NACP 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dilip K. Das
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cultural StudiesEnglish and Foreign Languages UniversityHyderabadIndia

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