Advertisement

Incipient Pedagogy (II): AIDS Narratives

  • Dilip K. Das
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines written and cinematic narratives of AIDS in India, many of which were linked to pedagogic projects. It brings out the diverse ways in which HIV/AIDS was understood as a medical, social, ethical and juridical problem in popular discourse. Many of these narratives focus on the subjective experience of disease as illness, thus engaging the disease/illness polarity to show how it can either perpetuate the idea of disease as personal devastation or resist it through collective biosocial formations like the PLWHA movement.

Keywords

Disease/illness Disease cartographies Illness narratives Biosociality PLWHA Vulnerability 

References

  1. Adorno, T. W., & Horkheimer, M. (1972). Dialectic of enlightenment (J. Cumming, Trans.). London: Verso.Google Scholar
  2. Akhavi, N. (Ed.). (2008). AIDS Sutra: Untold stories from India. New Delhi: Random House India.Google Scholar
  3. Albert, E. (1986). Illness as deviance: The response of the press to AIDS. In D. A. Feldman & T. M. Johnson (Eds.), The social dimension of AIDS: Method and theory (pp. 163–178). New York: Praeger.Google Scholar
  4. Arnold, D. (1993). Colonizing the body: State medicine and epidemic disease in nineteenth-century India. Berkeley/Los Angeles/London: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  5. Arnold, D. (2005). The tropics and the travelling gaze: India, landscape, and science (pp. 1800–1856). Delhi: Permanent Black.Google Scholar
  6. Bakhtin, M. M. (1981). Forms of time and the chronotope in the Novel. In The dialogic imagination (C. Emerson, & M. Holquist, Trans., pp. 84–258). Austin: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
  7. Balaje, S., (Producer) & Revathy (Director). (2004). Phir Milenge [Motion picture]. India: Percept Picture Co.Google Scholar
  8. Baria, F. (1997). AIDS: Striking home. India Today, March 1–15.Google Scholar
  9. Benjamin, W. (1969). Illuminations. (H. Arendt, Ed., H. Zohn, Trans.). New York: Schocken.Google Scholar
  10. Curtin, P. D. (1996). Disease and Imperialism. In D. Arnold (Ed.), Warm climates and western medicine: The emergence of tropical medicine, 1500–1900 (pp. 99–107). Amsterdam/Atlanta: Rodopi.Google Scholar
  11. Dattani, M. (2005). Ek Alag Mausam: A screenplay. New Delhi: Penguin Random House India e-book, e-ISBN: 978-9-351-18231-3.Google Scholar
  12. Descartes, R. (1965). Discourse on method, optics, geometry and meteorology (P. J. Olscamp, Trans.). New York: Bobbs-Merill.Google Scholar
  13. De, S. (2008). In N. Akhavi (Ed.), “When AIDS came home.” AIDS sutra: Untold stories from India (pp. 245–254). New Delhi: Random House India.Google Scholar
  14. Douglas, M. (1966). Purity and danger: An analysis of concept of pollution and taboo. London/New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  15. Dube, S. (2000). Sex, lies and AIDS. New Delhi: Harper Collins India.Google Scholar
  16. Faleiro, S. (2008). In N. Akhavi (Ed.), “Maarne ka, bhagaane ka.” AIDS Sutra: Untold Stories from India. New Delhi: Random House India.Google Scholar
  17. Foucault, M. (1973). The birth of the clinic: An archaeology of medical perception. New York: Random House.Google Scholar
  18. Foucault, M. (2003). Society must be defended: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1975–76 (D. Macey, Trans.). New York: Picador.Google Scholar
  19. Gangopadhyay, S. (2008). In N. Akhavi (Ed.), “Return to Sonagachhi.” AIDS sutra: Untold stories from India (pp. 157–175). New Delhi: Random House India.Google Scholar
  20. Geertz, C. (1973). The interpretation of cultures: Selected essays. NY: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  21. Gilbert, P. K. (2003). Mapping colonial disease: Victorian medical cartography in British India. In G. S. Rousseau, M. Gill, D. Haycock, & M. Herwig (Eds.), Framing and imagining disease in cultural history (pp. 111–128). Hampshire/New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Gilman, S. L. (1988). Disease and Representation: Images of Illness from Madness to AIDS. Ithaca/London: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Grover, J. Z. (1988). In D. Crimp (Ed.), “AIDS: Keywords.” AIDS cultural analysis, cultural activism (pp. 17–30). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  24. Gwyn, R. (2002). Communicating health and illness. London/Thousand Oaks/New Delhi: Sage.Google Scholar
  25. Harrison, M. (1999). Climates and constitutions: Health, race, environment and British imperialism in India 1600–1850. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  26. Harvey, W. (1963). The circulation of blood and other writings (K. J. Franklin, Trans.). London: Everyman.Google Scholar
  27. Helman, C. G. (1981). Disease versus illness in general practice. The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners, 31, 548–552.Google Scholar
  28. Hoffman, A. (1988). At risk. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons.Google Scholar
  29. Jackson, J. (1901). In Leper land, being a record of my tour of 7,000 miles among Indian Lepers, including some notes on missions and an account of eleven days with Miss Mary Reed and her Lepers. London: Marshall Brothers.Google Scholar
  30. Jain, K. (2002). Positive lives: The story of Ashok and others with HIV. New Delhi: Penguin India.Google Scholar
  31. Johnson, J. (1813). The influence of tropical climates, more especially the climate of India, on European constitutions; and the principal effects and diseases thereby induced, their prevention and removal, and the means of preserving health in hot climates rendered obvious to Europeans of every capacity. London: J. J. Stockdale.Google Scholar
  32. Jones, N. (2008). In N. Akhavi (Ed.), “Love in the time of positives.” AIDS sutra: Untold stories from India (pp. 313–334). New Delhi: Random House India.Google Scholar
  33. Kesavan, M. (2008). In N. Akhavi (Ed.), “Nowhere to call home.” AIDS sutra: Untold stories from India (pp. 179–195). New Delhi: Random House India.Google Scholar
  34. Kleinman, A. (1995). Writing at the margin: Discourse between anthropology and medicine. Berkeley/Los Angeles/London: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  35. Koch, T. (2005). Cartographies of disease: Maps, mapping, and medicine. Redlands: ESRI Press.Google Scholar
  36. LaCapra, D. (1983). Rethinking intellectual history: texts, contexts, language. Ithaca/London: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  37. Lakshmi, C. S. (2008). In N. Akhavi (Ed.), “At stake, the body.” AIDS sutra: Untold stories from India (pp. 101–106). New Delhi: Random House India.Google Scholar
  38. Lalwani, N. (2008). In N. Akhavi (Ed.), “Mr X versus hospital Y.” AIDS sutra: Untold stories from India (pp. 19–35). New Delhi: Random House India.Google Scholar
  39. Levinas, E. (1988). Useless suffering. In R. Bernasconi & D. Wood (Eds.), The provocation of Levinas: Rethinking the other (pp. 156–167). London/New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  40. Martin, J. R. (1837). Notes on the medical topography of Calcutta. Calcutta: Bengal Military Orphan Press.Google Scholar
  41. Merleau-Ponty, Maurice. (1962). Phenomenology of perception (C. Smith, Trans.). London/New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  42. Mukherjee, H., & Sippy, N. C. (Producers) & Mukherjee, H. (Director). (1971). Anand [Motion picture]. India: Rupan Chitra.Google Scholar
  43. Mukherjee, H., & Sippy, N. C. (Producers) & Mukherjee, H. (Director). (1975). Mili [Motion picture]. India: N.C. Sippy.Google Scholar
  44. National AIDS Control Organisation (NACO). (2004). Annual report 2002–2003, 2003–2004 (Upto 31 July 2004). http://www.aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/documents/India_NACO_Annual_report_2000_2004.pdf.pdf. Accessed on 24 Aug 2018.
  45. National AIDS Control Organisation (NACO). (2016). Annual report 2015–16. http://naco.gov.in/sites/default/files/Annual%20Report%202015-16_NACO.pdf. Accessed 28 Jan 2018.
  46. Pandit, R. V. (Producer) & Manjrekar, M. (Director). (2000). Nidaan [Motion Picture]. India: Pan Pictures.Google Scholar
  47. Pastore, J. L. (1992). Suburban AIDS: Alice Hoffman’s at risk. In E. S. Nelson (Ed.), AIDS: The literary response (pp. 39–49). New York: Twayne.Google Scholar
  48. Pati, B., & Harrison, M. (2001). Introduction. In B. Pati & M. Harrison (Eds.), Health, medicine and empire: Perspectives on colonial India (pp. 1–36). Hyderabad: Orient Longman.Google Scholar
  49. Rabinow, P. (2005). Artificiality and enlightenment: From sociobiology to biosociality. In X. Inda (Ed.), Anthropologies of modernity: Foucault, governmentality, and life politics. Malden: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  50. Rangarajan, M. (2000). Scoring with a message. The Hindu online edition, June 19. http://www.thehindu.com/thehindu/2000/06/19/stories/09190222.htm. Accessed 20 Dec 2017.
  51. Ricoeur, P. (1984). Time and narrative (Vol. 1). (K. Mclaughlin, & D. Pellauer, Trans.). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  52. Rushdie, S. (2008). In N. Akhavi (Ed.), “The half-woman god.” AIDS sutra: Untold stories from India (pp. 109–117). New Delhi: Random House India.Google Scholar
  53. Samuthiram. (2001). A dove in desert (V. S. Karuppannan, Trans.). Chennai: Ekalaivan Pathipagam.Google Scholar
  54. Samuthiram. (2002). The third gender (P. Vasudev, Trans.). Chennai: Ekalaivan Pathipagam.Google Scholar
  55. Sasi, K. P. (Producer & Director). (2005). Ek Alag Mausam [Motion picture]. India: Penta Enterprise.Google Scholar
  56. Sen, A. (2008). In N. Akhavi (Ed.), “Foreword: Understanding the challenge of AIDS.” AIDS sutra: Untold stories from India (pp. 1–15). New Delhi: Random House India.Google Scholar
  57. Shanghvi, S. D. (2008). In N. Akhavi (Ed.), “Hello, Darling.” AIDS sutra: Untold stories from India (pp. 59–75). New Delhi: Random House India.Google Scholar
  58. Siddiqui, R. A. (2003). Ek Alag Mausam, a different joy. The Hindu online edition, July 17. http://www.thehindu.com/thehindu/mp/2003/07/17/stories/2003071700450200.htm. Accessed 20 Dec 2017.
  59. Sontag, S. (1978). Illness as metaphor. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.Google Scholar
  60. Sontag, S. (1988). AIDS and its metaphors. London: Penguin.Google Scholar
  61. Spiegel, M., & Danielle, S. (2017). Accounts of self: Exploring Relationality through literature. In R. Charon et al. (Eds.), The principles and practice of narrative medicine (pp. 15–36). NY: OUP.Google Scholar
  62. Sturken, M., & Cartwright, L. (2001). Practices of looking: An introduction to visual culture. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  63. Suri, S. (Producer) and Onir (Director). (2005). My brother Nikhil [Motion picture]. India: Four Front Films.Google Scholar
  64. Treichler, P. (1999). How to have theory in an epidemic: Cultural chronicles of AIDS. Durham/London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  65. Turner, B. S. (2008). The body and society: Explorations in social theory. Los Angeles/London/New Delhi/Singapore: Sage.Google Scholar
  66. Watney, S. (1990). Representing AIDS. In S. Gupta & T. Boffin (Eds.), Ecstatic antibodies: Resisting the AIDS mythology. London: Rivers Oram.Google Scholar
  67. Watney, S. (1994). Practices of freedom: Selected writings on HIV/AIDS. Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  68. White, H. (1978). Tropics of discourse: Essays in cultural criticism. Baltimore/London: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  69. Wilton, T. (1997). EnGendering AIDS: Deconstructing sex, text and epidemic. London/Thousand Oaks/New Delhi: Sage.Google Scholar
  70. Worboys, M. (1996). Germs, malaria and the invention of mansonian tropical medicine: From ‘diseases in the tropics’ to ‘tropical diseases’. In D. Arnold (Ed.), Warm climates and western medicine: The emergence of tropical medicine, 1500–1900 (pp. 181–207). Amsterdam/Atlanta: Rodopi.Google Scholar
  71. Yingling, T. E. (1997). In R. Wiegman (Ed.), AIDS and the National Body. Durham/London: Duke UP.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dilip K. Das
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cultural StudiesEnglish and Foreign Languages UniversityHyderabadIndia

Personalised recommendations