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Theoretical Foundations

  • Yuping ChenEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

In recent years, the analysis of screen discourse has been much discussed in the field of audiovisual translation with a particular focus on subtitle translation. In the light of current developments in subtitle translation and my preliminary search of the existing literature, this chapter first reviews four types of research on subtitle translation with a view to locating a research niche for this book. Then it moves on to the detailed discussion of the major issues in subtitle translation and the introduction of the theoretical foundations to be adopted in this book to address Chinese subtitle translation in English language films.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.China Agricultural UniversityBeijingChina

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