Advertisement

Toxicity Induction in the Intestine and Epidermis in Nematodes Exposed to Environmental Toxicants or Stresses

  • Dayong Wang
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, we focused on the introduction of damage at different aspects on the intestine and epidermis, two important primary targeted organs for environmental toxicants. We first introduced and discussed the toxicity induction in the intestine of nematodes exposed to environmental toxicants or stresses with the concerns on activation of oxidative stress in the intestine, enhancement in intestinal permeability, damage on intestinal development, suppression of innate immune response, prolonged defecation behavior, and increase in fat storage. Moreover, we introduced and discussed the possible toxicity of environmental toxicants or stresses on the epidermis in nematodes under certain conditions.

Keywords

Intestinal damage Epidermal damage Toxicity induction Environmental exposure Caenorhabditis elegans 

References

  1. 1.
    Wang D-Y (2018) Nanotoxicology in Caenorhabditis elegans. Springer, SingaporeCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Wang D-Y (2018) Molecular toxicology in Caenorhabditis elegans. Springer, SingaporeCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Yin J-C, Liu R, Jian Z-H, Yang D, Pu Y-P, Yin L-H, Wang D-Y (2018) Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate-induced reproductive toxicity involved in DNA damage-dependent oocyte apoptosis and oxidative stress in Caenorhabditis elegans. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 163:298–306CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Wang D-Y, Yu Y-L, Li Y-X, Wang Y, Wang D-Y (2014) Dopamine receptors antagonistically regulate behavioral choice between conflicting alternatives in C. elegans. PLoS One 9:e115985CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Li Y-X, Wang Y, Hu Y-O, Zhong J-X, Wang D-Y (2011) Modulation of the assay system for the sensory integration of 2 sensory stimuli that inhibit each other in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Neurosci Bull 27:69–82CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ruan Q-L, Qiao Y, Zhao Y-L, Xu Y, Wang M, Duan J-A, Wang D-Y. (2016) Beneficial effects of Glycyrrhizae radix extract in preventing oxidative damage and extending the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. J Ethnopharmacol 177: 101–110CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Zhao Y-L, Wu Q-L, Li Y-P, Wang D-Y (2013) Translocation, transfer, and in vivo safety evaluation of engineered nanomaterials in the non-mammalian alternative toxicity assay model of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. RSC Adv 3:5741–5757CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Wang D-Y (2016) Biological effects, translocation, and metabolism of quantum dots in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Toxicol Res 5:1003–1011CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Wang Q-Q, Zhao S-Q, Zhao Y-L, Rui Q, Wang D-Y (2014) Toxicity and translocation of graphene oxide in Arabidopsis plants under stress conditions. RSC Adv 4:60891–60901CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Wu Q-L, Zhao Y-L, Li Y-P, Wang D-Y (2014) Molecular signals regulating translocation and toxicity of graphene oxide in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Nanoscale 6:11204–11212CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Wu Q-L, Zhao Y-L, Zhao G, Wang D-Y (2014) microRNAs control of in vivo toxicity from graphene oxide in Caenorhabditis elegans. Nanomed Nanotechnol Biol Med 10:1401–1410CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Zhao Y-L, Wu Q-L, Wang D-Y (2015) A microRNAs-mRNAs network involved in the control of graphene oxide toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans. RSC Adv 5:92394–92405CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Wu Q-L, Yin L, Li X, Tang M, Zhang T, Wang D-Y (2013) Contributions of altered permeability of intestinal barrier and defecation behavior to toxicity formation from graphene oxide in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Nanoscale 5:9934–9943CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Zhao L, Rui Q, Wang D-Y (2017) Molecular basis for oxidative stress induced by simulated microgravity in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Sci Total Environ 607–608:1381–1390CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Li W-J, Wang D-Y, Wang D-Y (2018) Regulation of the response of Caenorhabditis elegans to simulated microgravity by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. Sci Rep 8:857CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Ding X-C, Wang J, Rui Q, Wang D-Y (2018) Long-term exposure to thiolated graphene oxide in the range of μg/L induces toxicity in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Sci Total Environ 616–617:29–37CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Wu Q-L, Rui Q, He K-W, Shen L-L, Wang D-Y (2010) UNC-64 and RIC-4, the plasma membrane associated SNAREs syntaxin and SNAP-25, regulate fat storage in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Neurosci Bull 26:104–116CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Xiao G-S, Zhao L, Huang Q, Yang J-N, Du H-H, Guo D-Q, Xia M-X, Li G-M, Chen Z-X, Wang D-Y (2018) Toxicity evaluation of Wanzhou watershed of Yangtze Three Gorges Reservoir in the flood season in Caenorhabditis elegans. Sci Rep 8:6734CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Xiao G-S, Zhao L, Huang Q, Du H-H, Guo D-Q, Xia M-X, Li G-M, Chen Z-X, Wang D-Y (2018) Biosafety assessment of water samples from Wanzhou watershed of Yangtze Three Gorges Reservoir in the quiet season in Caenorhabditis elegans. Sci Rep 8:14102CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Dong S-S, Qu M, Rui Q, Wang D-Y (2018) Combinational effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and nanopolystyrene particles at environmentally relevant concentrations on nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 161:444–450CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Shao H-M, Han Z-Y, Krasteva N, Wang D-Y (2018) Identification of signaling cascade in the insulin signaling pathway in response to nanopolystyrene particles. Nanotoxicology.  https://doi.org/10.1080/17435390.2018.1530395
  22. 22.
    Zhao L, Qu M, Wong G, Wang D-Y (2017) Transgenerational toxicity of nanopolystyrene particles in the range of μg/L in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Environ Sci Nanomater 4:2356–2366CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Qu M, Xu K-N, Li Y-H, Wong G, Wang D-Y (2018) Using acs-22 mutant Caenorhabditis elegans to detect the toxicity of nanopolystyrene particles. Sci Total Environ 643:119–126CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Wu Q-L, Zhao Y-L, Li Y-P, Wang D-Y (2014) Susceptible genes regulate the adverse effects of TiO2-NPs at predicted environmental relevant concentrations on nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Nanomed Nanotechnol Biol Med 10:1263–1271CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Wu Q-L, Nouara A, Li Y-P, Zhang M, Wang W, Tang M, Ye B-P, Ding J-D, Wang D-Y (2013) Comparison of toxicities from three metal oxide nanoparticles at environmental relevant concentrations in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Chemosphere 90:1123–1131CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Rui Q, Zhao Y-L, Wu Q-L, Tang M, Wang D-Y (2013) Biosafety assessment of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in acutely exposed nematode Caenorhabditis elegans with mutations of genes required for oxidative stress or stress response. Chemosphere 93:2289–2296CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Li Y-X, Wang W, Wu Q-L, Li Y-P, Tang M, Ye B-P, Wang D-Y (2012) Molecular control of TiO2-NPs toxicity formation at predicted environmental relevant concentrations by Mn-SODs proteins. PLoS One 7:e44688CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Wu Q-L, Wang W, Li Y-X, Li Y-P, Ye B-P, Tang M, Wang D-Y (2012) Small sizes of TiO2-NPs exhibit adverse effects at predicted environmental relevant concentrations on nematodes in a modified chronic toxicity assay system. J Hazard Mater 243:161–168CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Zhao Y-L, Wu Q-L, Tang M, Wang D-Y (2014) The in vivo underlying mechanism for recovery response formation in nano-titanium dioxide exposed Caenorhabditis elegans after transfer to the normal condition. Nanomed Nanotechnol Biol Med 10:89–98CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Sun L-M, Liao K, Hong C-C, Wang D-Y (2017) Honokiol induces reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in Candida albicans through mitochondrial dysfunction. PLoS One 12:e0172228CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Sun L-M, Liao K, Wang D-Y (2017) Honokiol induces superoxide production by targeting mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I in Candida albicans. PLoS One 12:e0184003CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Yu Y-L, Zhi L-T, Guan X-M, Wang D-Y, Wang D-Y (2016) FLP-4 neuropeptide and its receptor in a neuronal circuit regulate preference choice through functions of ASH-2 trithorax complex in Caenorhabditis elegans. Sci Rep 6:21485CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. 33.
    Sun L-M, Zhi L-T, Shakoor S, Liao K, Wang D-Y (2016) microRNAs involved in the control of innate immunity in Candida infected Caenorhabditis elegans. Sci Rep 6:36036CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    Sun L-M, Liao K, Li Y-P, Zhao L, Liang S, Guo D, Hu J, Wang D-Y (2016) Synergy between PVP-coated silver nanoparticles and azole antifungal against drug-resistant Candida albicans. J Nanosci Nanotechnol 16:2325–2335CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    Stutz K, Kaech A, Aebi M, Künzler M, Hengartner MO (2015) Disruption of the C. elegans intestinal brush border by the fungal lectin CCL2 phenocopies dietary lectin toxicity in mammals. PLoS One 10:e0129381CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. 36.
    Zhi L-T, Yu Y-L, Jiang Z-X, Wang D-Y (2017) mir-355 functions as an important link between p38 MAPK signaling and insulin signaling in the regulation of innate immunity. Sci Rep 7:14560CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. 37.
    Yu Y-L, Zhi L-T, Wu Q-L, Jing L-N, Wang D-Y (2018) NPR-9 regulates innate immune response in Caenorhabditis elegans by antagonizing activity of AIB interneurons. Cell Mol Immunol 15:27–37CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. 38.
    Ren M-X, Zhao L, Lv X, Wang D-Y (2017) Antimicrobial proteins in the response to graphene oxide in Caenorhabditis elegans. Nanotoxicology 11:578–590CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    Wu Q-L, Zhao Y-L, Fang J-P, Wang D-Y (2014) Immune response is required for the control of in vivo translocation and chronic toxicity of graphene oxide. Nanoscale 6:5894–5906CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. 40.
    Zhao Y-L, Wang X, Wu Q-L, Li Y-P, Tang M, Wang D-Y (2015) Quantum dots exposure alters both development and function of D-type GABAergic motor neurons in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Toxicol Res 4:399–408CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. 41.
    Liu Z-F, Zhou X-F, Wu Q-L, Zhao Y-L, Wang D-Y (2015) Crucial role of intestinal barrier in the formation of transgenerational toxicity in quantum dots exposed nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans. RSC Adv 5:94257–94266CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. 42.
    Zhao Y-L, Wang X, Wu Q-L, Li Y-P, Wang D-Y (2015) Translocation and neurotoxicity of CdTe quantum dots in RMEs motor neurons in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. J Hazard Mater 283:480–489CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. 43.
    Wu Q-L, Zhi L-T, Qu Y-Y, Wang D-Y (2016) Quantum dots increased fat storage in intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans by influencing molecular basis for fatty acid metabolism. Nanomed Nanotechnol Biol Med 12:1175–1184CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. 44.
    Ding X-C, Rui Q, Wang D-Y (2018) Functional disruption in epidermal barrier enhances toxicity and accumulation of graphene oxide. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 163:456–464CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. 45.
    Wu Q-L, Zhou X-F, Han X-X, Zhuo Y-Z, Zhu S-T, Zhao Y-L, Wang D-Y (2016) Genome-wide identification and functional analysis of long noncoding RNAs involved in the response to graphene oxide. Biomaterials 102:277–291CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. 46.
    Zhao L, Kong J-T, Krasteva N, Wang D-Y (2018) Deficit in epidermal barrier induces toxicity and translocation of PEG modified graphene oxide in nematodes. Toxicol Res 7:1061–1070CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dayong Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.School of MedicineSoutheast UniversityNanjingChina

Personalised recommendations