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The Role of Non-formal Learning Environments in Education and Socialization of Children with Visual Disability: The Case of Museums

  • Vassilios ArgyropoulosEmail author
  • Charikleia Kanari
Chapter

Abstract

Over the last decades, intensive discussions, practices, and policies have taken place toward an inclusive society and the opportunities for equal social participation for all people. Among the main sectors of social life, education and culture have a critical role. Within the above framework, many researchers have studied the relationship between educational and cultural settings such as schools and museums identifying the multiple benefits for all children with and without disabilities. The present chapter based on literature review and research data explores Special Education teachers’ perceptions regarding the role of museums to the development of social skills and social inclusion of children with visual disability. Forty-three Special Education teachers participated in the present study and the data were obtained via questionnaires and interviews. The results add to the discussion regarding: (a) perceptions of Special Education teachers toward the role of museums to the development of social skills by children with visual disability and (b) appropriate conditions under which the development of social skills of children with visual disability is enhanced in a collaborative framework consisting of museums and schools. Findings may enrich the discussion about issues of education of children with disabilities, the role of non-formal learning environments in education and socialization of children with visual disability as well as the dynamic relationship between schools and museums toward inclusive practices and social inclusion.

Keywords

Children with visual disability Museums Social skills Educational and social inclusion 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Special EducationUniversity of ThessalyVolosGreece

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