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Internet Development and Internet Addiction in China

  • Qiaolei Jiang
Chapter

Abstract

Chapter  2 presented a literature review of relevant theories and previous research, and proposed a research framework for this research. The purpose of this chapter is to provide background information on the main concern (Internet addiction in Mainland China) for this research, and justification of the current study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qiaolei Jiang
    • 1
  1. 1.Tsinghua UniversityBeijingChina

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