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The Static Elastoplastic Model for Geomaterial

  • Yuanxue LiuEmail author
  • Yingren Zheng
Chapter
Part of the Springer Geophysics book series (SPRINGERGEOPHYS)

Abstract

Elastoplastic theory assumes that elastic deformation coexists with plastic deformation. The total strain can be divided into two parts: elastic and plastic.

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Copyright information

© Science Press and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Geotechnical EngineeringLogistical Engineering UniversityChongqingChina
  2. 2.Institute of Geotechnical EngineeringLogistical Engineering UniversityChongqingChina

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