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Productive Teacher Noticing: Implications for Improving Teaching

  • Ban Heng ChoyEmail author
  • Jaguthsing Dindyal
Chapter
Part of the Mathematics Education – An Asian Perspective book series (MATHEDUCASPER)

Abstract

Although there have been calls to focus on teacher-inquiry approaches to teacher professional development, simply putting teachers together in a professional learning team is not sufficient for improving teaching. What matters is what, and how, teachers notice when they learn from their teaching practices. In this chapter, we first give an overview of the crucial role of teacher noticing in professional development by drawing on relevant literature. Next, we explain the notion of productive teacher noticing by highlighting what and how teachers notice as they attempt to enact teaching practices, aimed at enhancing students’ reasoning. Following this, we describe two studies on productive teacher noticing in Singapore before we highlight some implications for improving practice and suggest possible future trajectories of research into teacher noticing.

Keywords

Learning from teaching Mathematics teacher noticing Teacher education Teacher professional development 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Part of this chapter refers to data from the research project “Portraits of teacher noticing during orchestration of learning experiences in the mathematics classrooms” (OER 03/16 CBH), funded by the Office of Educational Research (OER), National Institute of Education (NIE), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, as part of the NIE Education Research Funding Programme (ERFP). The views expressed in this chapter are the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of NIE.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Institute of EducationSingaporeSingapore

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