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Use of Technology in Mathematics Education

  • Wee Leng NgEmail author
  • Beng Chong Teo
  • Joseph B. W. Yeo
  • Weng Kin Ho
  • Kok Ming Teo
Chapter
Part of the Mathematics Education – An Asian Perspective book series (MATHEDUCASPER)

Abstract

This chapter discusses the use of information and communications technology (ICT) in mathematics education from primary to tertiary level. The focus is on how ICT has been, or could be used, in enhancing the teaching and learning of mathematics, particularly in the Singapore context. Four main ICT tools, namely hand-held technology, dynamic geometry software, computing and programming tools and e-learning, are examined. Our examination of each tool entails, the why, what and how of the tool and research on the use of the tool in Singapore schools. Generally, in the context of the sites of research, there is encouraging positive impact of the tools on student learning of mathematics.

Keywords

Information and communications technology Hand-held technology Graphing calculators Computer algebra system Dynamic geometry software Computing and programming E-Learning Flipped classroom 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wee Leng Ng
    • 1
    Email author
  • Beng Chong Teo
    • 1
  • Joseph B. W. Yeo
    • 1
  • Weng Kin Ho
    • 1
  • Kok Ming Teo
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of EducationSingaporeSingapore

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