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Metacognition in the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

  • Ngan Hoe LeeEmail author
  • Kit Ee Dawn Ng
  • Joseph B. W. Yeo
Chapter
Part of the Mathematics Education – An Asian Perspective book series (MATHEDUCASPER)

Abstract

This chapter first presents the evolving conceptualisation of metacognition since it was first coined by Flavell in 1976. In particular, the issue of awareness, monitoring, and regulation of both cognitive and affective resources was examined. The role that metacognition plays in mathematical problem-solving was also examined, leading to a discussion of the role of metacognition in the Singapore School Mathematics Curriculum which has mathematical problem-solving as its central aim. In view of this, the conceptualisation of metacognition as well as the how’s of addressing metacognition in the Singapore mathematics classrooms were discussed from the intended curriculum point of view. Some of the local postgraduate works on metacognition and teaching, and learning of mathematics was also presented to provide an overview of the landscape of the work in this area that has been undertaken thus far. In addition, examples of ongoing works on metacognitive approaches, which have made some inroads in some local schools, were shared to give the reader a glimpse of how research in this area has impacted school practices locally. The chapter concludes with implications for addressing metacognition in the Singapore Mathematics classrooms from the perspective of teachers’ professional development.

Keywords

Singapore School Mathematics Curriculum Cognition Metacognition Offline metacognition Online metacognition Metacognitive instructional strategies Mathematical problem-solving Teaching and learning of mathematics Reflection Reflective practice model Meta-metacognition Theory of mind Social metacognition 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ngan Hoe Lee
    • 1
    Email author
  • Kit Ee Dawn Ng
    • 1
  • Joseph B. W. Yeo
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of EducationSingaporeSingapore

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