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The Corpus Approach to the Teaching and Learning of Chinese as an L1 and an L2 in Retrospect

  • Jiajin XuEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Chinese Language Learning Sciences book series (CLLS)

Abstract

The use of corpora in the teaching and learning of Chinese has a history of nearly a century. Pedagogically oriented Chinese corpus studies have originated on a solid methodological footing before computers were available. The creation of concordances and character/word lists, coupled with quantitative analyses of sentence patterns, have offered fascinating insights into Chinese textbook compilation and syllabus design. Such corpus findings have illuminated what lexical items and grammatical patterns should be taught, and in what order vocabulary and grammar points should be presented. Over the last few decades, the craze for Chinese interlanguage corpora has been largely motivated by China’s growing global influence. The lexico-grammatical performance in the spoken and written production of Chinese as a second language (CSL) learners has been systematically investigated. Both corpus-based L1 and L2 Chinese studies have been fairly successful in terms of the description of the Chinese (inter)language, but there is still much room for pedagogical implementation, that is, to transform the research into classroom friendly teaching materials.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The research was supported in part by the key project of the National Research Centre for Foreign Language Education (MOE Key Research Institute of Humanities and Social Sciences at Universities) (Ref No.: 17JJD740003) at Beijing Foreign Studies University. The author gratefully acknowledges the funding of the Fulbright Visiting Scholar grant during the writing up of the article. The author would also like to thank the referees and editors for their constructive comments, Professor Chengzhi Chu for providing helpful resource of ChineseTA, and Professor Eniko Csomay and Dr. Lu Lu for proofreading the manuscript.

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© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Beijing Foreign Studies UniversityBeijingChina

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