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Transitions, Institutions and Public Policy

  • Philip Andrews-SpeedEmail author
  • Sufang Zhang
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Series in Asia and Pacific Studies book series (PSAPS)

Abstract

This chapter outlines the main concepts that will underpin the analysis. The framework builds on the growing convergence between transition studies and institutionalism and between institutionalism and public policy. The chapter begins by summarising the main features of socio-technical transitions before examining those aspects of institutional theory that help to elaborate transitions and transition management. This is followed by a synthesis of selected concepts from the field of public policy that illustrates the relevance of institutionalism to different stages in the policy cycle. The final section shows how a growing number of scholars have been drawing on different elements of institutional theory to analyse energy governance in general and the low-carbon energy transition in particular.

Keywords

Socio-technical transition Institutions Public policy Low-carbon energy transition 

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© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore
  2. 2.North China Electric Power UniversityBeijingChina

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