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Role of Tumor Markers

  • Sarah Lynam
  • Shashikant LeleEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Serum tumor markers have a pivotal role in the screening, differential diagnosis, risk stratification, management, and surveillance of gynecologic diseases. For the approximate 20% of women who develop a pelvic mass or adnexal cyst, patterns of serum markers including CA125 and HE4 aid in preoperative identification of women at increased risk of gynecologic malignancy. CA125 is crucial to disease management and surveillance in women with epithelial ovarian cancers. The use of AFP, inhibin, human chorionic gonadotropin, and lactate dehydrogenase are described in women with less common pathologies including germ cell and sex cord stromal tumors of the ovary. It is important to note that despite the use of these markers, there remains no superior method for early identification of gynecologic malignancies including epithelial ovarian cancer. Implementation and interpretation of these tests rely on appropriate clinical application of serum tumor markers with an understanding of confounding factors that may affect individual patient results.

Keywords

Tumor marker Cancer screening Biomarkers Cancer antigen CA125 HE4 Inhibin AFP Carcinoembryonic antigen Ovarian cancer 

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© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Gynecologic OncologyRoswell Park Cancer InstituteBuffaloUSA

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