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Political Partisanship and Australia’s Volatile Aid to Africa

  • Nikola Pijović
Chapter
Part of the Africa's Global Engagement: Perspectives from Emerging Countries book series (AGEG)

Abstract

This chapter examines in detail why Australia’s contemporary engagement with Africa is so politically partisan. Pijović examines the differing foreign policy outlooks—the ideas about Australia’s place in the world—of Australia’s two main political forces, the conservative Liberal-National Party coalition, and the centre-left Labor Party. He argues that these foreign policy outlooks—the conservatives’ ‘bilateralist regionalism’ vs. Labor’s ‘middle power’ approach—have resulted in a politically partisan, fickle, and volatile engagement with Africa. While Labor governments exhibit at least some interest in engaging with Africa, conservative governments largely do not. The second part of the chapter details how these politically partisan approaches have resulted in a great deal of volatility in Australia’s development assistance to Africa since the 1990s.

Keywords

Foreign Policy Outlook ‘Middle power’ ‘Bilateralist regionalism’ Conservatives Aid to Africa 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nikola Pijović
    • 1
  1. 1.Africa Research and Engagement Centre, University of Western AustraliaPerthAustralia

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