Advertisement

Industry 4.0

  • Ajey LeleEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies book series (SIST, volume 132)

Abstract

This chapter debates various technologies discussed in the previous section, under a shared context. Beyond disruption, a common thread running through this work is that all technologies discussed here could be addressed together as the technologies responsible for making the Fourth Industrial Revolution a reality. Most of these technologies tend to offer higher levels of automation, greater speeds and accuracy. These technologies, singularly or jointly, offer various options to the armed forces to improve their operational readiness. Rapid industrial progress (civil and military) is expected when these technologies reach maturation in the near future. Eventually, these technologies are expected to decide the success of Industry 4.0 together.

References

  1. 1.
    Industrial Revolution. https://www.britannica.com/event/Industrial-Revolution. Accessed 6 June 2018
  2. 2.
    Morgan, J.: What is the Fourth Industrial Revolution? (2016). https://www.forbes.com/sites/jacobmorgan/2016/02/19/what-is-the-4th-industrial-revolution/#4fb272fef392. Accessed 2 June 2018
  3. 3.
    Earls, A.R.: From Germany to the World: Industry 4.0. (2015). https://www.smartindustry.com/blog/smart-industry-connect/from-germany-to-the-world-industry-4-0/. Accessed 8 June 2018
  4. 4.
    Mikusz, M.: Towards an understanding of cyber-physical systems as industrial software-product-service systems. Procedia CIRP 16, 385–389 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bartodziej, C.: The Concept Industry 4.0, pp. 53–54. Springer, New York (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Germany: Industrie 4.0, report prepared for the European Commission, Directorate-General Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs: 5Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    PwC, 2015 Global Digital IQ Survey: 6Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Industry 4.0: A Brief History of Automation and Tech Advancement (2017). https://olinblog.wustl.edu/2017/07/industry-4-0-brief-history/. Accessed 2 June 2018
  9. 9.
    Park, H.S.: Technology convergence, open innovation, and dynamic economy. Park J. Open Innov. Technol. Market Complex. 3(24), 3–6 (2017)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Technology and Innovation for the Future of Production: Accelerating Value Creation. White Paper, World Economic Forum, Geneva: 4 (2017)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Rojko, A. Industry 4.0 concept: background and overview. iJIM 11(5), 80–81 (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Gilchrist, A.: Industry 4.0: 218. Springer, New York (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
  14. 14.
    Wang, S.: Implementing smart factory of industrie 4.0: an outlook. Int. J. Distrib. Sens. Netw., 1 (2016)Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    McCormick, R., Hartmann, D.: Smart Factories Need Smart Machine (2018). https://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/ADI_Smart_Factories_Need_Smart_Machines.PDF. Accessed 5 June 2018
  16. 16.
    Smart Industry and Smart Manufacturing—Industrial Transformation. https://www.i-scoop.eu/manufacturing-industry/#What_is_smart_manufacturing_A_manufacturing_definition_and_overview. Accessed 10 June 2018
  17. 17.
    Kusiak, A.: Smart manufacturing. Int. J. Prod. Res. 56(1–2), 508–517 (2017)Google Scholar
  18. 18.
  19. 19.
    McCormick, R., Hartmann, D.: Smart Factories Need Smart Machine. https://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/ADI_Smart_Factories_Need_Smart_Machines.PDF. Accessed 4 June 2018
  20. 20.
    Baotong, C., et al.: Smart factory of industry 4.0: key technologies, application case, and challenges. Browse Journals & Magazines, IEEE Access. 6, 6506 (2018)Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Industry 4.0: What Does It Mean to Australian Defence Industry (2018). https://home.kpmg.com/au/en/home/insights/2018/05/industry-4-0-australian-defence.html. Accessed 2 June 2018

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Defence Studies and AnalysesNew DelhiIndia

Personalised recommendations