Advertisement

Blockchain

  • Ajey LeleEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies book series (SIST, volume 132)

Abstract

There are three basic reasons why blockchain technology is being discussed as last chapter of this section. First, in comparison with all other technologies discussed so far, this technology is of very recent origin. Two, there is a belief of few that this technology should not be recognized as disruptive technology but more as a foundational technology with massive potential for both growth and utility. Three, this technology impacts (or is associated with) various direct IT-based technologies like say cloud, AI and IoT which have been discussed in the previous chapters of this section as disruptive technologies. For the purpose of this chapter, these three issues are kept at a backdrop and only briefly touched upon. The main objective of this chapter remains same as previous chapters, that is to check the validity of this technology for bringing out disruption in various defence sectors.

References

  1. 1.
    Mearian, L.: What is blockchain? The most disruptive tech in decades, May 21, 2018. http://computerworld.in/feature/what-blockchain-most-disruptive-tech-decades. Accessed on 28 May 2018
  2. 2.
    Barnas, N.B.: Blockchains in National Defense: Trustworthy Systems in a Trustless World. A Research Report submitted to Air University, Maxwell Air Force Base, p. 19, Alabama, June 2016Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Proof-of-Work, or PoW, is the original consensus algorithm in a Blockchain network. For more on this issue please refer Andrew Tar, “Proof-of-Work, Explained”, Jan 17, 2018. https://cointelegraph.com/explained/proof-of-work-explained#. Accessed on 30 May 2018
  4. 4.
    Blockchain. ITNOW, pp. 58–61, Mar 2016Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Marr, B.: A Very Brief History of Blockchain Technology Everyone Should Read, Feb 16, 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/bernardmarr/2018/02/16/a-very-brief-history-of-blockchain-technology-everyone-should-read/#60d188f67bc4. Accessed on 30 May 2018
  6. 6.
    Vinod Kumar, T.M. (ed.): E-Democracy for Smart Cities, pp. 511–513. Springer Nature, Singapore (2017)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Snir, U.: Canada: Blockchain: The Disruptive Technology Changing The Legal Landscape, Mar 14, 2018. http://www.mondaq.com/canada/x/682656/fin+tech/Blockchain+The+Disruptive+Technology+Changing+the+Legal+Landscape. Accessed on 26 May 2018
  8. 8.
    Ethereum Foundation: A Swiss non-profit organisation undertook this project with global contributions. Refer https://www.ethereum.org/. Accessed on 31 May 2018
  9. 9.
    New usages mentioned over here are based on Vinay Gupta. A Brief History of Blockchain, Feb 28, 2017. https://hbr.org/2017/02/a-brief-history-of-blockchain. Accessed on 30 May 2018
  10. 10.
    Kulshrestha, S.: Military Applications of Blockchain Technology, Nov 23, 2016. http://www.claws.in/1666/military-applications-of-blockchain-technology-sanatan-kulshrestha.html. Accessed on 28 May 2018
  11. 11.
    Richard Stroupe Jr, T.: How Blockchain Could Save Federal Agencies Billions, Mar 16, 2018. https://www.cnbc.com/2018/03/16/blockchain-could-save-federal-agencies-billions.html. Accessed on 20 May 2018
  12. 12.
    Joshi, N.: Revolutionizing Defense with Blockchain, Feb 27, 2018. https://www.allerin.com/blog/revolutionizing-defense-with-blockchain. Accessed on 01 June 2018
  13. 13.
    How Blockchain Technology Could Completely Change Aerospace, Mar 13, 2018. https://www.proponent.com/how-blockchain-technology-change-aerospace/. Accessed on 20 May 2018
  14. 14.
  15. 15.
    Barnas, N.B.: Blockchains in National Defense: Trustworthy Systems in a Trustless World. A Research Report submitted to Air University, pp. 28–29, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, June 2016Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Defence Studies and AnalysesNew DelhiIndia

Personalised recommendations