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“The Landside Airside Concept”: Breaking to Reconnect—The “People Mover” at Tampa International Airport, 1962–1971

  • Victor MarquezEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, author discusses changes in the landside–airside boundary as a result of the world’s massification of air travel and the new availability of planning experts. At Tampa International Airport, or TIA (1971), some of the first qualified airport planners pioneered the way the landside–airside boundary could be set in a different spatial dimension, which they called the “Landside Airside Concept” (1963). The outcome was a radical innovation that became an instant airport-planning touchstone and a model adopted worldwide. In the mind of Marge Brink Coridan, Tampa’s head planner, airside included both the apron and the satellite buildings split from the center; landside referred to a central facility that would work as a transportation node. In fact, LF&A rapidly copyrighted the revolutionary scheme. This section collects and analyzes the key voices of those experts who intervened in the conception of TIA.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Mexico CityMexico

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