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Introduction

  • Victor MarquezEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The book is a thorough revision of airport history and airport planning that builds up a new theory about how airports are formed from the outset. The author identifies for the first time the landside–airside boundary as the single most important feature that shapes an airport. In this sense, it challenges the “historical linearity” that, until today, partially explains a century of airports. It is when airports need to be reinvented that we may be able to understand their lack of technological stability. Marquez sustains that historically, only three airports have been rethought from the ground up: the 1939 NY–LaGuardia Airport, the 1961 Washington–Dulles Airport, and the 1971 Tampa International Airport, all of which happen to be in the USA. These three examples share at least two common threads: First, that a higher entity specifically ordered a full reinvention of the airport. Second, that these three reinventions reached only a rhetorical closure—meaning that the problem of the airport was never truly solved, and this historical “irresolution” brought the landside–airside conflict into the light. Along the book, the boundary works as a filter or a lens that may help us build a different notion of what airports are. The secret is that the landside airside boundary is not necessarily an essential part of the airport. It is a socio-technical construct though that we have complicated until there is no other way to think of an airport today, except in terms of the boundary itself.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Mexico CityMexico

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