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Addressing Feelings of Relative Deprivation of Muslim Minority for Inclusive Development

  • Rashmi Kumar
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter draws from the findings of studies done in the Indian context on Hindu and Muslim intergroup relations. It specifically considers the theory of ‘relative deprivation’ in understanding various aspects of intergroup relations from feelings of injustice to intergroup attitudes to conflict resolution strategies to engaging in action for the betterment of one’s owngroup situation. Social development becomes meaningless if there is no peace, harmony and co-existence in society due to perceived injustice and a sense of exclusion. Policy implications for inclusive development have also been discussed.

Keywords

Relative deprivation Intergroup relations Social exclusion Inclusive development Muslim minority in India Social policy Sachar report 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rashmi Kumar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of AllahabadAllahabadIndia

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