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The Role of Civil Service and the Human Resource Management Policies Required for the Government of the Future

  • Byeong-soo YoonEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Future societies will be significantly different from those of today. Precarious economic growth, growing income disparities, employment decline, ageing populations, increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters, instability in energy supplies and rapid development of information technologies are some of the factors that will influence such change. Consequently, governments around the world will need to confront the repercussions of such factors on the societies of the future. Equally, they will need to cope with the new demands and expectations of citizens arising from the information technologies-induced revolution, which empowers citizens by providing them with the means to make their voices heard and challenge their government leaders in connection with their ability and willingness to address public concerns. Hence, for governments to be efficient and effective in this complex, interlinked and fast-changing environment, they will need to redesign their organisational structures and operational processes, as well as attract and recruit a different type of civil servants in order to cope with such overwhelming change. Under these circumstances, governments of the future will need to adapt and evolve in order to remain relevant by effectively responding to the rapidly changing conditions, in both the external environment and citizens’ rising expectations and demands. Governments will need to build their capacities to operate effectively in complex, interdependent networks of organisations and systems across the public, private and non-profit sectors in order to co-produce “public value.” In this context, it is imperative that civil service systems in most, if not all, countries around the world will require considerable modernisation. Current civil service systems are traditionally structured, rigid, inward-looking and based on outdated competencies. In addition to increasing their networking and collaborative capabilities, skills and competencies, they will also need to be more transparent, flexible and participatory. Thus, several drastic measures are needed to transform the civil service systems of the future. The aim of this chapter is to examine the factors that are causing rapid changes in the world as we know it today and briefly analyse how such changes will impact the structure and operation of governments. It also looks at the preconditions needed to be in place for the public service systems of the future governments. In this context, the chapter contemplates the role of public service in the twenty-first century and presents the essential features and characteristics civil servants should possess for coping in an adequate manner. Finally, it presents the human resources policies required by future governments, with respect to recruitment, training and continuous education, retainment, performance appraisal, compensation and civil service welfare among others.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Central Officials Training Institute (COTI)SeoulKorea

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