Advertisement

Existing Approaches to Economic Regionalism and Their Limitations

  • Faris Al-Fadhat
Chapter
Part of the Critical Studies of the Asia-Pacific book series (CSAP)

Abstract

Since the end of the Cold War, the development of economic regionalism in many parts of the globe has been a matter of scholarly debate concerning the forms, instruments, and mechanisms of regional governance. The existing literature has developed around three different emphases, namely the functional objectives of regional economic integration, the nation-state’s strategy in order to survive, and the political and economic sources of regional institution building. These emphases emerged from the international relations theory and have been associated with three different groups of literature: the liberal framework of regionalism (functionalism and neoliberal institutionalism); the realist approach; and the political economy approach respectively. This chapter provides an analysis that finds that these existing approaches have limitations in explaining the social forces that drive the regional economic institution. The chapter shows that it is essential to place the broader structural context of the transformation of capitalist class in defining the economic project at regional level.

Bibliography

  1. Acharya, Amitav. 2013. The Making of Southeast Asia: International Relations of a Region. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Balassa, Bela. 1961. The Theory of Economic Integration. London: Allen & Unwin.Google Scholar
  3. Baldwin, David A., ed. 1993. Neorealism and Neoliberalism. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Baldwin, Richard. 1993. “A Domino Theory of Regionalism.” Working Paper No. 4465, September. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.Google Scholar
  5. Baldwin, Richard. 2006. “Multilateralising Regionalism: Spaghetti Bowls as Building Blocs on the Path to Global Free Trade.” World Economy No. 29 (11):1451–1518.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Baldwin, Richard, and Patrick Low, eds. 2008. Multilateralizing Regionalism. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Beeson, Mark. 2005. “Rethinking Regionalism: Europe and East Asia in Comparative Historical Perspective.” Journal of European Public Policy No. 12 (6):969–985.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Beeson, Mark. 2007. Regionalism and Globalization in East Asia: Politics, Security and Economic Development. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  9. Beeson, Mark. 2008. Institution of the Asia-Pacific: ASEAN, APEC and Beyond. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Beeson, Mark. 2009. “Geopolitics and the Making of Regions: The Fall and Rise of East Asia.” Political Studies No. 57:498–516.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Beeson, Mark, and Richard Stubbs, eds. 2012. Routledge Handbook of Asian Regionalism. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  12. Blyth, Mark M. 2002. “Institutions and Ideas.” In Theory and Methods in Political Science, edited by David Marsh and Gerry Stoker, 292–311. London: Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Bowles, Paul, and Brian MacLean. 1996. “Understanding Trade Bloc Formation: The Case of the ASEAN Free Trade Area.” Review of International Political Economy No. 3 (2):319–348.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Breslin, Shaun, and Richard Higgott. 2000. “Studying Regions: Learning from the Old, Constructing the New.” New Political Economy No. 5 (3):333–352.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Cai, Kevin G. 2010. The Politics of Economic Regionalism: Explaining Regional Economic Integration in East Asia. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Chia, Siow Yue. 2010. “Trade and Investment Policies and Regional Economic Integration in East Asia.” No. 210. Tokyo: Asian Development Bank Institute.Google Scholar
  17. Choi, Byung-Il, and Kong-Jin Lee. 2005. “A Long and Winding Road: Ratification of Korea’s First FTA.” In Korea and International Conflicts: Case Studies–Volume 1, edited by Byung-Il Choi, 11–47. Seoul: Institute for International Trade and Cooperation, Ewha Womans University.Google Scholar
  18. Choi, Ji Young. 2012. “A Comparative Analysis of Economic Regionalism in Europe and East Asia: A Historical Institutionalist Approach.” Journal of International and Area Studies No. 19 (1):59–77.Google Scholar
  19. Farrell, Mary, Björn Hettne, and Luk Van Langenhove, eds. 2005. Global Politics of Regionalism: Theory and Practice. London: Pluto Press.Google Scholar
  20. Fawcett, Louise. 1995. “Regionalism in Historical Perspective.” In Regionalism in World Politics: Regional Organization and International Order, edited by Louise Fawcett and Andrew Hurrell, 9–36. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  21. Fawcett, Louise. 2004. “Exploring Regional Domains: A Comparative History of Regionalism.” International Affairs No. 80 (3):429–446.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Fawcett, Louise. 2005. “Regionalism from an Historical Perspective.” In Global Politics of Regionalism: Theory and Practice, edited by Mary Farrell, Björn Hettne and Luk Van Langenhove, 21–37. London: Pluto Press.Google Scholar
  23. Glassman, Jim. 1999. “State Power beyond the ‘Territorial Trap’: The Internationalization of the State.” Political Geography No. 18 (6):669–696.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Griffiths, Martin, and Terry O’Callaghan. 2002. International Relations: The Key Concepts. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Grugel, Jean, and Wil Hout, eds. 1999. Regionalism Across the North-South Divide: State Strategies and Globalization. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  26. Haas, Ernst B. 1958. The Uniting of Europe: Political, Social and Economic Forces. London: Stevens.Google Scholar
  27. Haas, Ernst B. 1961. “International Integration: The European and the Universal Process.” International Organization No. 15:366–392.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Haggard, Stephan. 1997. “Regionalism in Asia and the Americas.” In The Political Economy of Regionalism, edited by Edward D. Mansfield and Helen V. Milner, 20–49. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  29. Hameiri, Shahar. 2009. “Beyond Methodological Nationalism, but Where to for the Study of Regional Governance?” Australian Journal of International Affairs No. 63 (3):430–441.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Hettne, Björn. 2003. “The New Regionalism Revisited.” In Theories of New Regionalism: A Palgrave Reader, edited by Fredrik Söderbaum and Timothy M. Shaw, 22–43. Basingstoke: Palgrave.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Hettne, Björn. 2005. “Beyond the ‘New’ Regionalism.” New Political Economy No. 10 (4):543–571.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Hettne, Björn, and Fredrik Söderbaum. 2000. “Theorising the Rise of Regionness.” New Political Economy No. 5 (3):457–472.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Hew, Denis, and Rahul Sen. 2004. “Towards an ASEAN Economic Community: Challenges and Prospects.” Singapore: ISEAS.Google Scholar
  34. Hew, Denis, and Hadi Soesastro. 2003. “Realizing the ASEAN Economic Community by 2020: ISEAS and ASEAN-ISIS Approaches.” ASEAN Economic Bulletin No. 20 (3):292–296.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Heywood, Andrew. 2011. Global Politics. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  36. Hurrell, Andrew. 1995a. “Explaining the Resurgence of Regionalism in World Politics.” Review of International Studies No. 21 (4):331–358.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Hurrell, Andrew. 1995b. “Regionalism in Theoretical Perspective.” In Regionalism in World Politics: Regional Organization and International Order, edited by Louise Fawcett and Andrew Hurrell, 37–73. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  38. Hveem, Helge. 2000. “Explaining the Regional Phenomenon in an Era of Globalisation.” In Political Economy and the Changing Global Order, edited by Richard Stubbs and Geoffrey G. R. Underhill, 70–81. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  39. Intal, Ponciano S. Jr. 1997. “ASEAN and the Challenge of Closer Economic Integration.” No. 97-14. Makati City: Philippine Institute for Development Studies.Google Scholar
  40. Jayasuriya, Kanishka. 2003. “Governing the Asia Pacific: Beyond the ‘New Regionalism’: Introduction.” Third World Quarterly No. 24 (2):199–215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Jayasuriya, Kanishka, ed. 2004. Asian Regional Governance: Crisis and Change. London: RoutledgeCurzon.Google Scholar
  42. Jayasuriya, Kanishka. 2008. “Regionalising the State: Political Topography of Regulatory Regionalism.” Contemporary Politics No. 14 (1):21–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Jessop, Bob. 1990. State Theory: Putting the Capitalist State in Its Place. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  44. Jones, Lee. 2015. “Explaining the Failure of the ASEAN Economic Community: The Primacy of Domestic Political Economy.” The Pacific Review No. 29 (5):1–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Katzenstein, Peter J. 1997. “Introduction: Asian Regionalism in Comparative Perspective.” In Network Power: Japan and Asia, edited by Peter J. Katzenstein and Takashi Shiraishi, 1–44. Ithaca, NY and London: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  46. Katzenstein, Peter J. 2005. A World of Regions: Asia and Europe in the American Imperium. Ithaca, NY and London: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  47. Keohane, Robert O. 1982. “The Demand for International Regimes.” International Organization No. 36 (2):325–355.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Keohane, Robert O. 1984. After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  49. Keohane, Robert O. 1989. International Institutions and State Power. Boulder, CO: Westview.Google Scholar
  50. Keohane, Robert O. 1993. “Institutionalist Theory and the Realist Challenge After the Cold War.” In Neorealism and Neoliberalism, edited by David A. Baldwin. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  51. Lindberg, Leon N. 1963. The Political Dynamics of European Economic Integration. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  52. Lindblom, Charles E. 1977. Politics and Markets. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  53. Mansfield, Edward D., and Helen V. Milner. 1997. “The Political Economy of Regionalism: An Overview.” In The Political Economy of Regionalism, edited by Edward D. Mansfield and Helen V. Milner, 1–19. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  54. Mansfield, Edward D., and Helen V. Milner. 1999. “The New Wave of Regionalism.” International Organization No. 53 (3):589–627.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Mearsheimer, John. 1990. “Back to the Future: Instability in Europe after the Cold War.” International Organization No. 15 (1):5–56.Google Scholar
  56. Milner, Helen. 1992. “International Theories of Cooperation among Nations: Strengths and Weaknesses.” World Politics No. 44 (3):466–496.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Milner, Helen, and Edward D. Mansfield. 1997. “The Political Economy of Regionalism.” In The Political Economy of Regionalism, edited by Helen Milner and Edward D. Mansfield, 1–20. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  58. Mitrany, David. 1966. A Working Peace System. Chicago: Quadrangle.Google Scholar
  59. Mittelman, James H. 2000. The Globalization Syndrome: Transformation and Resistance. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Nesadurai, Helen E. S. 2003. Globalisation, Domestic Politics and Regionalism: The ASEAN Free Trade Area. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Nesadurai, Helen E. S. 2008. “The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).” New Political Economy No. 13 (2):225–239.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Park, Sung-Hoon, and Min Gyo Koo. 2007. “Forming a Cross-Regional Partnership: The South Korea-Chile FTA and Its Implications.” Pacific Affairs No. 80 (2):259–278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Payne, Anthony, and Andrew Gamble. 1996. “Introduction: The Political Economy of Regionalism and World Order.” In Regionalism and World Order, edited by Anthony Payne and Andrew Gamble. London: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  64. Payne, Richard. 2007. “ASEAN Regionalism: Growth Through Integration.” Asia Pacific: Perspectives No. 7 (1):11–19.Google Scholar
  65. Pempel, T. J. 2005. “Introduction: Emerging Webs of Regional Connectedness.” In Remapping East Asia: The Construction of a Region, edited by T. J. Pempel, 1–30. Ithaca, NY and London: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  66. Pentland, C. C. 1990. “Integration, Interdependence, and Institutions: Approaches to International Order.” In World Politics: Power, Interdependence & Dependence, edited by David G. Haglund and Michael K. Hawes, 181–182. Toronto: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich Canada, Inc.Google Scholar
  67. Poulantzas, Nicos. 1978a. Classes in Contemporary Capitalism. London: Verso.Google Scholar
  68. Poulantzas, Nicos. 1978b. State, Power and Socialism. London: New Left Books.Google Scholar
  69. Ravenhill, John. 2010. “The ‘New East Asian Regionalism’: A Political Domino Effect.” Review of International Political Economy No. 17 (2):178–208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Rittberger, Volker, ed. 1993. Regime Theory and International Relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  71. Rosamond, Ben. 2000. Theories of European Integration. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  72. Rozman, Gilbert. 2012. “East Asian Regionalism.” In Routledge Handbook of Asian Regionalism, edited by Mark Beeson and Richard Stubbs. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  73. Searight, Amy. 2009. “Emerging Economic Architecture in Asia: Opening or Insulating the Region?” In Asia’s New Multilateralism, edited by Michael J. Green and Bates Gill, 193–242. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  74. Severino, Rodolfo C. 2011. “Politics of Association of Southeast Asian Nations Economic Cooperation.” Asian Economic Policy Review No. 6:22–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Söderbaum, Fredrik. 2012. “Theories of Regionalism.” In Routledge Handbook of Asian Regionalism, edited by Mark Beeson and Richard Stubbs. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  76. Soesastro, Hadi. 2005. “Accelerating ASEAN Economic Integration: Moving Beyond AFTA.” No. WPE 091. Jakarta: Centre for Strategic and International Studies.Google Scholar
  77. Stirk, Peter M. R. 1996. A History of European Integration Since 1914. London: Pinter.Google Scholar
  78. Stubbs, Richard. 2000. “Signing on to Liberalization: AFTA and the Politics of Regional Economic Cooperation.” The Pacific Review No. 13 (2):297–318.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Väyrynen, Raimo. 2003. “Regionalism: Old and New.” International Studies Review No. 5 (1):25–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. Walt, Stephen M. 1987. The Origins of Alliances. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  81. Waltz, Kenneth. 1979. Theory of International Politics. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  82. Wessels, Wolfgang. 1997. “An Ever Closer Fusion: A Dynamic Macropolitical View on Integration Processes.” Journal of Common Market Studies No. 35 (2):267–299.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. Wilson, Jeffrey D. 2012. “Resource Security: A New Motivation for Free Trade Agreements in the Asia-Pacific Region.” The Pacific Review No. 25 (4):429–453.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Wilson, Jeffrey D. 2015. “Mega-Regional Trade Deals in the Asia-Pacific: Choosing Between the TPP and RCEP?” Journal of Contemporary Asia No. 45 (2):345–353.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. Wilson, Peter. 2000. “The Export Competitiveness of Dynamic Asian Economies: 1983–1995.” Journal of Economic Studies No. 27 (6):541–565.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  86. Wunderlich, Jens-Uwe 2007. Regionalism, Globalisation and International Order: Europe and Southeast Asia. Hampshire: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  87. Wyatt-Walter, Andrew. 1995. “Regionalism, Globalization, and World Economic Order.” In Regionalism in World Politics: Regional Organization and International Order, edited by Louise Fawcett and Andrew Hurrell, 74–121. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Faris Al-Fadhat
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of International RelationsUniversitas Muhammadiyah YogyakartaBantulIndonesia

Personalised recommendations