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The Analysis on Discrimination Experienced by Immigrants in Korea and Its Implications for Multicultural Human Rights Education Policies

  • Sang Hwan SeongEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Multilingual Education book series (MULT, volume 32)

Abstract

Many multicultural education programs have been initiated in South Korea under the supervision of public organizations and civil societies. However, the number of multicultural programs for Korean adults in general is not enough. Also, the target population and topics for many of these programs are limited to immigrants only, providing education programs for these immigrants to fit into the Korean society. In order to shift the current trend and bring in a new paradigm of coexistence and cooperation in the multicultural society that Korea is becoming, on top of the protection of migrants’ other rights and interests, the general public’s acknowledgement of human rights issues and cultivation of welcoming attitudes toward immigrants would be necessary. As one way of approaching the issue, the current study aims to raise awareness of the importance and necessity of human rights education programs by analyzing the discrimination types and patterns experienced by the immigrants in Korea. By doing so, the results are expected to provide helpful reference for developing more effective multicultural human rights education programs in Korea.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Seoul National UniversitySeoulSouth Korea

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