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Using Technology to Support Discussion in Design and Technology

  • Adrian O’ConnorEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary Issues in Technology Education book series (CITE)

Abstract

This chapter shares the results of the design and implementation of a conceptual model which uses learning protocols to support communication between teachers and pupils. The findings show that both teachers and pupils responded positively to the integration of new pedagogical and technological approaches into their traditional environments as well as having the capacity to extend teaching and learning beyond the classroom. Pupils embraced this contemporary approach, indicating this stimulated their interest, motivation, and engagement in the regular day-to-day school activity, and the general perception is that it can enhance the processes and conditions of teaching and learning.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Portmarnock SchoolDublinIreland

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