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Summary and Implications

  • Fang Cao
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, I summarise the major findings of the study, and discuss policy implications for the Chinese government for aged care, and recommendations for future research.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fang Cao
    • 1
  1. 1.La Trobe UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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