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Virtual Reality Enzymes: An Interdisciplinary and International Project Towards an Inquiry-Based Pedagogy

  • Ryan Ba
  • Yuan Xie
  • Yuzhe Zhang
  • Siti Faatihah Binte Mohd Taib
  • Yiyu Cai
  • Zachary Walker
  • Zhong Chen
  • Sandra Tan
  • Ban Hoe Chow
  • Shi Min Lim
  • Dennis Pang
  • Sui Lin Goei
  • H. E. K. Matimba
  • Wouter van Joolingen
Chapter
Part of the Gaming Media and Social Effects book series (GMSE)

Abstract

Education in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics is moving towards more inquiry-based and creativity-stimulating pedagogies. Part of a curriculum based on such pedagogies should be challenging learning activities that engage students in investigation. At the same time, it is imperative that such activities are developed and validated in collaboration with the teachers who will incorporate them in their lesson planning. In this project, educators, researchers, and developers from Singapore and the Netherlands are working closely to develop innovative tools that assist biology education. Model-based and virtual reality-enabled solutions are being studied through interdisciplinary and international collaboration among the project members from the two countries.

Keywords

Virtual reality Serious games Biology Enzymes Inquiry-based pedagogy 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This project is partially supported by Ministry of Education Academic Fund (Singapore part) and RAAK-SIA (Dutch part).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryan Ba
    • 1
  • Yuan Xie
    • 1
  • Yuzhe Zhang
    • 1
  • Siti Faatihah Binte Mohd Taib
    • 1
  • Yiyu Cai
    • 1
  • Zachary Walker
    • 2
  • Zhong Chen
    • 2
  • Sandra Tan
    • 3
  • Ban Hoe Chow
    • 4
  • Shi Min Lim
    • 5
  • Dennis Pang
    • 6
  • Sui Lin Goei
    • 7
    • 8
  • H. E. K. Matimba
    • 9
  • Wouter van Joolingen
    • 9
  1. 1.Nanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeSingapore
  2. 2.National Institute of EducationSingaporeSingapore
  3. 3.Hwa Chong InstitutionSingaporeSingapore
  4. 4.River Valley High SchoolSingaporeSingapore
  5. 5.Nanyang Girls’ SchoolSingaporeSingapore
  6. 6.Riverside Secondary SchoolSingaporeSingapore
  7. 7.Windesheim University of Applied SciencesZwolleNetherlands
  8. 8.Free University of AmsterdamAmsterdamNetherlands
  9. 9.Freudenthal Institute, Utrecht UniversityUtrechtNetherlands

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