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Co-processing of Alternative Fuels and Resources in Indian Cement Industry—Baseline and Potential

  • Palash Kumar SahaEmail author
  • Kåre Helge Karstensen
Conference paper

Abstract

India is currently the second largest cement producer in the world and responsible for approximately 7% of India’s CO2 emissions. Thermal Substitution Rate (TSR) for the Indian cement industry on an average is currently 2.5%. The Indian cement industry is gearing up with its infrastructure, capacity, and competence for enhancing TSR including the installation of pre-processing platforms and adoption of newer technologies. For achieving 5% TSR in 2020 and 20% TSR in 2030, for every million tonne (Mt) of cement produced, 7000 tonnes and 25,000 tonnes of alternative fuels need to be co-processed, respectively. SINTEF is currently working on a Norwegian government-funded project in India—‘Co-processing of Alternative Fuels and Resources in the Cement Industry: Phase II’ (2017–2020), which is a continuation of Phase I project (2010–2015) and aims to improve the waste treatment capacity in the country through co-processing.

Keywords

Co-processing Cement Waste AFR TSR RDF Greenhouse gases 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SINTEFOsloNorway
  2. 2.Asian Institute of TechnologyKhlong LuangThailand

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