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Restructuring of Social Education and Lifelong Learning and Community Governance

  • Jeongyun Lee
Chapter
Part of the Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (EDAP, volume 47)

Abstract

In Japan, the term “social education” is used, while the equivalent term in America and Europe is “adult education” or “continued education.” “Social education” is a term coined by combining “society” with “education.” It is an established concept for education that is conscious of society, aimed at society, and involved in society (Matsuda 2014, p. 23). It is said that the term came into use in the 1880s, and social education achieved a major turnaround at the end of World War II. In other words, prior to and during the war, the education system was influenced by nationalism and militarism, with social education conducted under these principles. In the postwar educational reforms based on popular sovereignty, democracy, and pacifism, reforms in social education were implemented, and new legislation for social education was introduced. Facilities, including Kominkan (Japanese-style community learning centers), libraries, and museums were established all over Japan, with various social education programs offered at these facilities, mainly by local governments (Kobayashi 2013, p. 1).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of EducationThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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